Boats

Sailing Away

Have you ever wanted to sail away across the water? For people today, sailing is something that's done for fun, but not so long ago sailing ships were the only practical way to travel across the vast oceans. For sailors to rely on only wind power called for courage, intelligence, stamina, and strength.

Here Comes the Garbage Barge! by Jonah Winter and illustrations by Red Nose Studio

Here Comes the Garbage Barge!

On a blazing summer's day, there's nothing quite like the aroma of piping hot...garbage. It's gross, slimy, and we each make about four pounds of it per day. The one thing that everyone can agree on is that no one wants to deal with garbage, and that notion is exactly what Here Comes the Garbage Barge!  is all about.

In 1987, over 3,000 tons of Long Island, New York's garbage was loaded onto a barge and pulled by the tugboat Break of Dawn.  The plan was to unload the cargo in North Carolina, where poor farmers had been paid to bury the waste. But when the barge and its captain arrived, they met a police boat which refused to let them dock there under any circumstances. So began a wild goose chase up and down the coast to find a place to store the disgusting floating dump.

Kayak Fishing: The Complete Guide

By Cory Routh

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"This guide gives you a quick, clear understanding of the essential information youll need to get started in the growing sport of kayak fishing. Routh covers everything you will need to know for safe, fun and successful kayak fishing, including choosing the right kayak for fishing, kayak safety, basic paddle strokes, choosing the right fishing gear, tides and currents, finding fish, and more. Also includes kayak fishing instructor and guide listings."

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Travel: Copyright-Free Illustrations for Lovers of History

By Bobbie Kalman

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Etchings with descriptive text provide a look at various modes of transportation--boats, sleighs, coaches, railroads, and even horseless carriages--of the past.

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Local Steamboat Tragedy Remembered

In 1873, a steamboat loaded with passengers, livestock and produce caught fire and sank on the Potomac River near Aquia Creek. Traveling from Washington, the overloaded vessel carried three times more people than allowed by its license, and the engulfing flames and churning waters claimed 76 passengers, most of them women and children. A new book, Disaster on the Potomac: The Last Run of the Steamboat Wawaset, by Alvin Oickle, gives the details of that terrible day.

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Virginia's Northern Neck: A Pictorial History

By John C. Wilson

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Virginia's Northern Neck: A Pictorial History is filled with photos and illustrations that, along with informative text, give an lively dimension to the region's past, from early settlements to steamboat days to 20th-century lives well-lived.

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The Sailor Dog

By Margaret Wise Brown

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"Born at sea in the teeth of a gale, the sailor was a dog. Scuppers was his name."
A dog that has always wanted to go to sea finally realizes his dream. Join Scuppers as he makes his first voyage. This classic read-aloud never ages and will be wanted again and again.

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Someday

By Diane Paterson

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A tough bargain with a sly crow lands Gull and his silly landlubber friends in trouble when they take to the high seas on a boat named Someday

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Sail Away

By Donald Crews

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This picture book tells of a family's lovely day out in a sailboat.

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Henry, the Sailor Cat

By Mary Calhoun

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Who says cats don't like water? A sea-going Siamese like Henry sure wouldn't miss the chance for a glorious day of sailing, not when there are dolphins and whales and ocean breezes to enjoy. Sneaking aboard a sailboat, Henry embarks on an unforgettable aquatic adventure that captures the joy of sailing and sparkles with all the adventure of the sea.

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