Fourth of July

Red, White, and Blue Music

On July 4th, burgers sizzle on the grill, and cold drinks are passed around. Happy dogs play with frisbees, and sunburned kids finally climb out of the pool. In the growing darkness, fireworks begin to crackle and zoom overhead. At last a special song starts playing, and everyone gets quiet as they remember the reason for the celebration.

Red, White, and Blue Music

On July 4th, burgers sizzle on the grill, and cold drinks are passed around. Happy dogs play with frisbees, and sunburned kids finally climb out of the pool. In the growing darkness, fireworks begin to crackle and zoom overhead. At last a special song starts playing, and all the people get quiet as they remember the reason for the celebration.

When the American colonists declared independence from Great Britain on July 4, 1776, they were doing a very brave thing. They knew that there would be no easy way to make the words they put on paper real. The Continental Army would have to fight for the country's right to exist.

People made up new songs, often using old tunes, and sung them in the streets of America. These were full of pride and jokes about the British. There were lots of them! Some, like Yankee Doodle, are classics we still remember, and many songs told the war news, such as An American Frigate,* that tells the tale of one of John Paul Jones' battles on the sea.

The First Independence Day Celebration

By Kathy Allen

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In the United States, the Fourth of July means picnics, parades, and fireworks. But it wasn't always so. The First Independence Day happened during a time of war. Here's the story.
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Independence Day

By Molly Aloian

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What is Independence Day? -- Ruled by Great Britain -- Declaration of Independence -- Early celebrations -- Making speeches -- Decorations -- The American flag -- Picnics -- Parades -- Songs and music -- Baseball -- Fireworks -- Take a trip!
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Fourth of July Mice!

By Bethany Roberts

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It's the most patriotic of all holidays-Independence Day! The Holiday Mice take part in all the activities that make the Fourth of July fun: a parade, a picnic, a baseball game and sack race, and a refreshing dip in the stream. Even Mr. Mouse, the littlest mouse's special toy, joins in the festivities. The best part of all comes at the end of the day: a spectacular fireworks show!

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Looking for Uncle Louis on the Fourth of July

By Kathy Whitehead

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"It's the Fourth of July, and Joe and his mother have come to watch the big parade. They join the crowd that lines the street. People are talking and laughing and joking. But "where is Uncle Louie"? Joe wonders. The high school band marches by, with twirlers out front flinging their batons high in the air. A mariarchi band plays the national anthem. There are clowns, too, and a parade of horses. But there is no sign of Uncle Louie. Now Joe worries that Uncle Louie will miss the big parade. Then Joe sees a flash of chrome. Here come the lowriders! But where in the world is Uncle Louie? Kathy Whitehead's joyous story captures the thrill of watching an Independence Day parade in the American Southwest."
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