Great Britain

Nerd Do Well: A Small Boy’s Journey to Becoming a Big Kid by Simon Pegg

Nerd Do Well: A Small Boy’s Journey to Becoming a Big Kid by Simon Pegg

While some memoirs are incredibly complex and intrinsically difficult to categorize, most of the ones I’ve read tend to fit in one of two general groups: the experience-driven and the persona-driven. Avi Steinberg’s Running the Books exemplifies the experience-driven category. Steinberg was an unknown when his memoir was published, and that relative obscurity meant that most readers were not drawn to the book because of his persona or celebrity. It was the topic of the autobiography that caught the public’s attention--the fact that this young man had worked in a prison library and found a way to describe the disorienting experience with both clarity and depth. 

The Oxford Companion to Family and Local History

By David Hey, editor

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If like many Americans you're curious about your roots, this Companion is the perfect guide to investigating family history in the British Isles. Edited by David Hey, a leading authority, the book provides helpful information for anyone enquiring into their English, Irish, Scottish, or Welsh origins and for anyone working in genealogical research or on the social history of the British Isles.

This fully revised and updated edition has been newly structured for ease of use, with an informative thematic essay section followed by an A-Z dictionary with more than 2,000 jargon-free entries, as well as detailed appendices which include further reading and up-to-date recommended websites. New essays for this edition are: "A Guide for Beginners," "Links between British and American Families," "Black and Asian Family History," and an extended article on "Names." With research tips, a full background to the social history of communities and individuals, and a special updated appendix listing all national and local record offices with their contact details, this is an essential reference work for anyone interested in uncovering and understanding the past.

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Rebecca

By Daphne Du Maurier

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Poor, plain, and alone, a young woman marries a rich widower, but in his great English country house she feels she can't live up to his dazzling first wife, Rebecca-and then a terrible secret is revealed. –From Booklist
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Great Lives Series: Margaret Thatcher

For more than a decade, she was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom, and "Iron Maggie" Thatcher promoted a conservative agenda that focused on deregulation and anti-union policies.

The Royal Griffin: Frederick Prince of Wales

By John Walters

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A complete biography of Frederick, for whom Fredericksburg was named.

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Royal Gardens

By Roy Strong

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Lovely photographs enhance this ode to British royal families' fascination with gardening. An entire chapter is devoted to the Prince Frederick and his wife's development of the gardens at Kew.

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The New Cambridge Modern History: VII. The Old Regime 1713 - 63.

By J. O. Lindsay

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A political, military, and diplomatic history of the period with a special emphasis on international trade, technological progress and colonization, and European domination.

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George III: A Personal History

By Christopher Hibbert

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A more thorough and evenhanded examination of George III's character than Americans usually see. An early chapter is devoted to an exploration of George III's father, Prince Frederick. Also available on audiocassette.

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Carrie's War

By BBC production, based on the book by Nina Bawden

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At the start of World War II, 14-year-old Carrie and her younger brother Nick are separated from their mother and evacuated from war-torn London to a rural village in Wales, where they now live with a puritanical shopkeeper and his spinster sister.

Based on the book by Nina Bawden.

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Daring and Dangerous Joan Aiken

Born on September 4, 1924, in Rye, Sussex, England, Joan was the daughter of famed American writer, Conrad Aiken. She decided to be a writer when she was five years old and kept writing to the end of her days.

Growing up in a house filled with art and literature, she thoroughly enjoyed being homeschooled during her early years. When she was 12, she was sent to boarding school at the improbably named Wychwood near Oxford, England.