Board books

St. Patrick's Day Countdown

By Salina Yoon

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Count along with the forest friends in this shimmery board book! Five bright green holographic shamrock tabs and fun rhyming text make this a St. Patrick's Day treat!
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Princess Baby

By Karen Katz

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A toddler does not like any of the nicknames her parents have for her; she wants to be called by her "real" name, Princess Baby. JE Fic Kat Suggested for ages 2-5.
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The Little Mouse, the Red Ripe Strawberry, and the Big Hungry Bear

By Don and Audrey Wood

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Little Mouse worries that the big, hungry bear will take his freshly picked, ripe, red strawberry for himself.

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My First Passover

By Tomie De Paola

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Describes the special parts of a Seder meal which celebrates the Jewish feast of Passover.
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Max's Breakfast

By Rosemary Wells

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"You can't hide from your egg, Max!"

Wise words from his big sister Ruby have no effect on stubborn and adorable Max.

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Girl, 15, Charming But Insane

By Sue Limb

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Jess Jordan, big of bum and small of boob, wishes she had her best friend's figure and longs for an unattainable guy while ignoring her best guy friend, the class clown.

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Helen Oxenbury: On the Side of the Child

"One of the most important things is to laugh with your children and to let them see you think they're being funny when they're trying to be. It gives children enormous pleasure to think they've made you laugh. They feel they've reached one of the nicest parts in you.... As a picture book artist, I don't think one can be too much on the side of the child."

Helen Oxenbury, from Ways of Telling: Conversations on the Art of the Picture Book, by Leonard S. Marcus.

Helen Oxenbury understands babies. She knows that they are messy, cranky, and wonderful. She knows that few things fascinate a baby like, well, another baby. In the world of board books, those sturdy first books that are impervious to drool and can survive a few tasty chews, Helen Oxenbury reigns supreme.