Nursery rhymes

Nursery Rhyme Comics

Nursery Rhyme Comics

Nursery Rhyme Comics is an all-star line-up of cartoonists and illustrators who use their artistic chops to put fun spins on all sorts of old rhymes and songs. Fifty rhymes adapted by fifty cartoonists. Woo-hoo! I'd like to take a moment to point some choice selections.

Pocketful of Posies: A Treasury of Nursery Rhymes

By Salley Mavor

Go to catalog
A collection of nursery rhymes with hand-sewn fabric relief illustrations.
Reserve this title

The Missing Tarts

By B.G. Hennessy

Go to catalog

When the Queen of Hearts discovers that her strawberry tarts have been stolen, she enlists the help of many popular nursery rhyme characters in order to find them.

Reserve this title

Mamá Goose : a Latino nursery treasury = un tesor de rimas infantiles

By Alma Flor Ada and F. Isabel Campoy ; illustrated by Maribel Suárez ; creative editing of the English by Tracy Hefferman.

Go to catalog
Presents lullabies, finger plays, nursery rhymes, games, riddles, proverbs, and more in Spanish and English. -- Presenta arrullos, juegos y canciones infantiles, adivinanzas, proverbios y más, en español e inglés.
Reserve this title

Down by the Station

By Will Hillenbrand

Go to catalog
What's more fun than a train? A train filled with zoo animals! The familiar rhyme takes on some extra playfulness when elephants, seals, and monkeys hop aboard. JE Fic Hil
Reserve this title

I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Pie

By Alison Jackson

Go to catalog

It's a silly, silly book! The old lady who swallowed a pie, swallowed some cider "that rumbled and mumbled and grumbled inside her" to moisten the pie, the Thanksgiving pie which was really too dry! As the lady eats and eats, she gets bigger and bigger.

Reserve this title

Grandparents Song

By Sheila Hamanaka

Go to catalog
All the many cultures of grandparents in America are celebrated in this lovely, rhyming book.
Reserve this title

Simms Taback: Welcome to the Shtetl

Mr. Taback grew up in the East Bronx of New York City in 1930s and 40s. His family was Jewish, and they had strong ties to Eastern Europe. Their neighborhood was made up of many such families who together created a community rich in the traditions of the Old Country. When he was a young boy, he spoke the Yiddish language. Although he remembers little of it today, the old songs, stories, and ways of life have made a tremendous impact on the work of this Caldecott Award-winner. In old Poland, a village such as the one he grew up in would be called a shtetl.