England

Ruby Red

By Kerstin Gier

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Sixteen year-old Gwyneth never dreamed of traveling through time, like her cousin, Charlotte, has spent her entire life preparing to do. But then Gwyneth discovers that she is the one with the time-travel gene, and must learn all too quickly about her family’s confusing past and dangerous future.

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She-wolves: The Women Who Ruled England Before Elizabeth

By Helen Castor

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"When Edward VI died in 1553, the extraordinary fact was that there was no one left to claim the title of king of England. For the first time, England would have a reigning queen, but the question was which one: Katherine of Aragon's daughter, Mary; Anne Boleyn's daughter, Elizabeth; or one of their cousins, Lady Jane Grey or Mary, Queen of Scots.

"But female rule in England also had a past. Four hundred years before Edward's death, Matilda, daughter of Henry I and granddaughter of William the Conqueror, came tantalizingly close to securing the crown for herself. And between the twelfth and fifteenth centuries three more exceptional women -- Eleanor of Aquitaine, Isabella of France, and Margaret of Anjou -- discovered how much was possible if presumptions of male rule were not confronted so explicitly, and just how quickly they might be vilified as 'she-wolves' for their pains. The stories of these women, told here in all their vivid detail, expose the paradox that female heirs to the Tudor throne had no choice but to negotiate. Man was the head of woman, and the king was the head of all. How, then, could royal power lie in female hands?"

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Who Murdered Chaucer: A Medieval Mystery

By Terry Jones

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"In this work of historical speculation Terry Jones and a team of international scholars investigate the mystery surrounding the death of Geoffrey Chaucer over 600 years ago.… What if he was murdered? What if he and his writings had become politically inconvenient in the seismic social shift that occurred with the overthrow of the liberal Richard II by the reactionary, oppressive regime of Henry IV? … This hypothesis is the introduction to a reading of Chaucer's writings as evidence that might be held against him, interwoven with a portrait of one of the most turbulent periods in English history, its politics and its personalities."

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Wives and Daughters: The Women of Sixteenth Century England

By Kathy Lynn Emerson

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Sixteenth-century England was scarcely a paradise for anyone by modern standards. Yet despite huge obstacles, many sixteenth-century women achieved personal success and even personal wealth. This is a resource for all interested in this time-period.

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The Writer's Guide to Everyday Life in Renaissance England: From 1485-1649

By Kathy Lynn Emerson

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"If your writing takes you into the England of the Renaissance, you've surely researched the period's sweeping cultural changes. But the Renaissance is a large tapestry, and it is the often-elusive day-to-day details you weave into your work that bring characters, settings and actions to life. You'll find your details here. In a book that's like a telescope through time, Kathy Lynn Emerson takes you to 1485-1649 England, to show you how people lived. You'll discover fashions of the day, including codpieces for men, bodices for women - many items with some assembly required; what people ate, table customs, and the ubiquity of alehouses in the land; family life, the elaborate customs of courtship and marriage, the problems of infidelity; what the Royal Court was like; the litigious society that was Renaissance England - and the punishments meted out; the work, food and discomfort of seafarers engaged in commerce or piracy; causes for celebration - the major religious and secular festivals; life in the cities and the rural areas, and much more."

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The Reign of Elizabeth I

By Carole Levin

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"...looks at the difficulties Elizabeth and England faced during a time
of war and economic distress, and great social and cultural changes. During this time, England became a Protestant nation, and though Elizabeth tried to keep peace, by the end of her reign England was involved in a war with Catholic Spain. The period was also significant culturally and socially, as gender expectations changed and Shakespeare's plays were part of a great cultural development."

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The Elizabethan Renaissance: The Life of the Society

By Alfred Leslie Rowse

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"Presents the daily lives of members of the different social classes in Elizabethan England. Includes a section on Elizabeth's fascination with the occult."

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Elizabeth I

By Anne Somerset

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"Glitteringly detailed and engagingly written, the magisterial Elizabeth I brings to vivid life the golden age of sixteenth-century England and the uniquely fascinating monarch who presided over it. A woman of intellect and presence, Elizabeth was the object of extravagant adoration by her contemporaries. She firmly believed in the divine providence of her sovereignty and exercised supreme authority over the intrigue-laden Tudor court and Elizabethan England at large. Brilliant, mercurial, seductive, and maddening, an inspiration to artists and adventurers and the subject of vicious speculation over her choice not to marry, Elizabeth became the most powerful ruler of her time. Anne Somerset has immortalized her in this splendidly illuminating account."

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A Travel Guide to Shakespeare's London

By James Barter

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"...a colorful and lively period travel guide that provides glimpses into the life of this great city at the time of Queen Elizabeth, four hundred years ago. Travelers wishing to visit London are provided information about travel tips, the best inns for lodging, great food in taverns or pubs, and guided tours of London's oldest and most historically significant architecture. Interspersed within the guide are recommendations for daily cultural and entertaining activities as well as day trips outside of the city."

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The Queen's Progress: An Elizabethan Alphabet

By Celeste Mannis; illustrations by Bagram Ibatoulline

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"Rhymed verses, stunning illustrations, and a fascinating text all come together to form this imaginative story about Queen Elizabeth and her progresses, or journeys, through England's countryside. Ibatoulline's illustrations are not only beautiful colorful works of art, they also tell a story within a story-one about the attempted murder of the queen and about her loyal servants who seek revenge. The main text follows Elizabeth's travels and is filled with anecdotes and historical details. Perfect for history-lovers, alert readers, and suspense-seekers, this multi-layered picture book reveals something new with each reading."

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