Kids Blog

05/23/2017 - 11:33am
Meeting Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou is famous today for her memorable words. She should also be remembered for her indomitable spirit.

04/16/2018 - 3:36pm

Week of the Young Child

Grow a Reader classes | Fast Facts About the Early Years

Our Community Partners: Rappahannock Area Community Services Board, Rappahannock United Way, Smart Beginnings Rappahannock Area, The Childcare Network, Germanna Community College

Children need a strong early learning foundation to succeed in school and life. We are proud to partner with the following local organizations to bring attention to this issue of vital importance to our community: Rappahannock Area Community Services Board, Rappahannock United Way, Smart Beginnings Rappahannock Area, The Childcare Network, Germanna Community College, and The Doctor Yum Project.

Did you know?

  • 90% percent of a child’s brain is developed before reaching kindergarten.
  • Children exposed to books early in life have better language skills than those who wait.
  • The seeds of a desirable workforce skills—critical thinking, teamwork, effective communication—are planted before the age of five.

What can you do?

Bring your children and spread the word about the library’s Grow a Reader classes. Each class is presented by specially trained staff who share stories, songs, and activities that lay the foundation your child needs to get ready to read.

  • Visit your local library regularly to check out titles even your baby is sure to enjoy!
  • Read to your child daily and keep it fun! Stop reading as soon as they show you they're done.
  • Reach out and thank parents, teachers, and all adults who help young children get a great start.
03/24/2017 - 11:05am
The Girl Who Drank the Moon

There is a witch in the woods. The people of the Protectorate know it. Each year, they are forced to leave a baby as a sacrifice to the witch, lest she destroy the whole city.

But just who is the witch in Kelly Barnhill’s Newbery Award-winning book, The Girl Who Drank the Moon? Maybe it’s Xan, who can’t figure out why the people of the Protectorate keep abandoning their children, but protects the babies with her magic until she can find them adopted homes in the Free Cities. Or, perhaps it’s Xan’s adopted granddaughter Luna, who became enmagicked and now spends her days with Fyrian, the Perfectly Tiny Dragon who thinks he’s a Simply Enormous Dragon, or Glerk, the poetry-obsessed monster who lives in the Bog. It’s certainly not Antain, a young man from the Protectorate who is becoming more and more determined to stop the yearly sacrifice.

03/22/2017 - 8:30am

Whether leaping through the vines of a rainforest or the pages of a book at the library, monkeys have lots to teach us about the ways animals live, our responsibilities in caring for the last wild places, and just how to have fun.

I'll bet you know that monkeys are furry, cute, and swing in the trees, but there's so much more to learn about them:

A Monkey is NOT an Ape

Monkeys have tails, but apes do not. Chimpanzees, gibbons, orangutans, and gorillas are all apes. They use their powerful arms and legs to swing through the trees. Many New World monkeys from South America can use their tails like another hand to swing. Monkeys from Asia and India can't do that! Monkeys, apes, and humans are all part of a family group called primates.

03/01/2017 - 9:39am

Outside the wind is lifting just so, ruffling the new leaves on the trees and chasing the old ones away. It's spring, a time to celebrate the rebirth of the flowers and the greening of the trees. It's time to go fly a kite and watch it buck and soar in the breeze.

You can make a simple kite all by yourself, paint it or color it with markers, and let it fly up in the air. 

05/23/2017 - 11:34am
Leo and Diane Dillon: An Artful Marriage

Leo Dillon was fascinated by Diane Sorber before he ever laid eyes on her. It was one of her paintings that caught his attention. For he did not know of any other student who had that deft, expressive technique. He was curious and a little jealous. He had a rival, and he knew it.

03/02/2017 - 2:03pm
So I have this project...

"Oh, by the way... "

Those were always the words my parents dreaded hearing when my brother and I were growing up. Usually, because it meant that one, or both of us, forgot about an upcoming project. Luckily, for us and my parents, we usually remembered sooner rather than later—but sometimes we did push it kind of close.

It’s not uncommon for parents and kids to come rushing into the library the night before a project is due looking for information and inspiration—but have no fear! We have some amazing project books here at the library that can help out students in just this situation. My booklist by no means has every book that would help, but it features some of the lesser known ones. Now, without any further procrastination, check out my "So, I have this project..." booklist.

02/16/2017 - 12:35am
Cover to Ada's Violin: The Story of the Recycled Orchestra of Paraguay by Susan Hood

“For me, the violin means everything . . . life.” —Ada Rios

In Ada Ríos’ hometown of Cateura, Paraguay, trash is a way of life. The landfill is a source of income for the gancheros, or recyclers, who spend the days picking through trash to find cardboard or plastic to sell. As a young girl, Ada wondered if she, too, would grow up to work in the landfill. Most people in her town did. Little did she know that trash would be a large part of her life in a completely unexpected way.

02/01/2017 - 3:36pm
Author of the Month: Langston Hughes

"I was unhappy for a long time, and very lonesome, living with my grandmother. Then it was that books began to happen to me, and I began to believe in nothing but books and the wonderful world in books — where if people suffered, they suffered in beautiful language, not in monosyllables, as we did in Kansas." (From The Big Sea, one of Hughes’ autobiographies) 

02/01/2017 - 11:36am

Our 16th president was a very odd-looking man. Long-limbed and raw-boned, this frontier president grew up without a lot of the niceties we take for granted today. He grew up surrounded by wilderness and not having much schooling. As he remembered it, "...I could read, write, and cipher (simple math) ... but that was all."

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