Teen Blog

Cafe Book H. H. Poole: Top Teen Picks 2013

Ultraviolet by R. J. Anderson

The votes are in and the 7th and 8th grade students from H.H. Poole Middle School have selected their favorites from the titles presented at this year's Cafe Book program.

The Top Pick is :

Ultraviolet by R. J. Anderson
Almost seventeen-year-old Alison, who has synesthesia, finds herself in a psychiatric facility accused of killing a classmate whose body cannot be found.



Other Favorites are:

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness Lions of Little Rock by Kristin Levine Wonder by R. J. Palacio

Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson True Blue by Deborah Ellis Starters by Lissa Price

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

Lions of Little Rock by Kristin Levine

Wonder by R. J. Palacio

Girl of Fire and Thorns by Rae Carson

True Blue by Deborah Ellis

Starters by Lissa Price

Cafe Book Heim Middle School: Top Teen Picks 2013

Michael Vey: The Prisoner of Cell 25 by Richard Paul Evans

The votes are in and the students at Shirley Heim Middle School have chosen their favorite titles from the books presented during this year's Cafe Book program.

Top Pick:

Michael Vey: The Prisoner of Cell 25 by Richard Paul Evans
Michael Vey seems like an ordinary teenager, but he has a unique power. After his mother is kidnapped he and his friends have to find his mother and fight the hunters to save other kids with the same powers.

 

Other Favorites:

Ultraviolet by R.J. Anderson Apothecary by Maile Meloy Cold Cereal by Adam Rex

Sweet Venom by Tera Lynn Childs Curveball: The Year I Lost my Grip by Jordan Sonnenblick A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

Ultraviolet by R.J. Anderson

Apothecary by Maile Meloy

Cold Cereal by Adam Rex

Sweet Venom by Tera Lynn Childs

Curveball: The Year I Lost my Grip by Jordan Sonnenblick

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness

Discover Earth Is Coming

Magic Planet

Mark your calendars!  You will definitely want to visit the England Run Branch between February 26 and April 24, 2013.  The Central Rappahannock Regional Library system is one of only ten libraries in the country to successfully apply for the grant-funded, museum-quality science exhibit, Discover Earth: A Century of Change!

A new catalog for the new year!

Do you long for a library catalog with more robust searching options, social networking, and reading recommendations? Are you a fan of Amazon or Goodreads? If so, we think you will love the new catalog that we will be unveiling soon. Check back here on Monday for more details and the link to try it out. We can’t wait until you experience the CRRL’s new way to connect with the library.

Citizen Science -- No Degree Required

Citizen Science -- No Degree Required

You don't have to be a rocket scientist to help astronomers learn about the Universe. You don't need a degree in biology to help track bird populations.  Interested in what whale songs mean? You guessed it—you don't need to be an oceanographer to help scientists figure it out. All it takes is an interest and computer access and you can join the growing ranks of Citizen Scientists. Most projects provide tutorials or clear instructions on their websites. You don't even have to be an adult!

Watch out for Cheap Tablets!

curtis klu tablet computer

Serial readers of the Tech Answers blog probably know that I would recommend either an iPad Mini or a Google Nexus 7 for an eReader tablet and that, though they are very pretty (the devices, not the blog readers, who could be pretty, but I wouldn’t know), I would guide most away from retailer-specific hardware like the Kindle Fire or the Barnes & Noble Nook.  But that overlooks one very important buying category: Cheap Tablets.  These are sub-$150 and often sub-$100 devices that you’ll find at convenience and drug stores.

Headquarters' Decorations - Go Green with the Grinch!

Headquarters' Decorations - Go Green with the Grinch!

This year the second floor of the Headquarters Library decided to do something a bit different for their holiday decorations. The Youth Services staff made the decision to have all of their decorations made from recycled and repurposed materials, specifically focusing on books weeded from the collection due to extreme damage. Then the system-wide Teen Council and teen volunteers from Headquarters handled the majority of the decoration creation. Over the course of three weeks these groups worked together to create the trees, snowflakes, paper chains and houses that make up the majority of the second floor decorations while staff members created the complementary hedgehogs. One fun twist that came from using old books was creating a game to go with the decorations.

Five trees created from old books are on the Youth Services Research Desk. We encourage all customers to come and try to guess which books were used to make the trees for a chance to win a prize. To go with the theme of recycled and repurposed decorations the Teen Council decided on the slogan “Go Green with the Grinch” to help tie all of the decorations together.

Check out this slideshow and view on Flickr to find out more about how some of the decorations were made.

Intro to Adobe Digital Editions

Adobe Digital Editions program icon

If you own a Nook, Sony, Kobo, or other non-Amazon e-ink (black and white) eBook reader listed here and you’ve checked out eBooks from CRRL, chances are you’ve had the misfortune of dealing with Adobe Digital Editions, the gateway between most copy-protected eBooks and reading devices.  If you’re planning on giving or receiving one of these toys this holiday season, you’ll want to read on.  Adobe Digital Editions is poorly designed, non-intuitive and relies far, far too heavily on keyboard shortcuts and buried menus.  Even with its recent, underwhelming 2.0 update, be you tech “dummy” or “genius," it’s a pain. Sadly, it’s what we’re all required to use in order to get our eBooks from the Internet to our devices.  Read on to learn its secrets.  

Tales from Tolkien: A Retrospective on Film Adaptations of Middle Earth

It has been over a decade since the first of Peter Jackson’s Lord of the Rings adaptations, The Fellowship of the Ring, was released.  This film was greeted with both critical and audience acclaim upon its debut, and became a definitive cinematic event of the early 21st Century.  On December 14, 2012, Jackson’s long-awaited adaptation of the prequel to The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit, will be released.  Jackson’s films have become regarded as classics to the point that many fans may become unhappy with anyone other than Peter Jackson making a cinematic Tolkien adaptation, and it may come as a surprise to them that some film adaptations of Tolkien’s mythic cycle had already been made prior to Jackson’s! While waiting for the release of the first film in Jackson’s Hobbit adaptation, let’s take a look back at some prior cinematic versions of Tolkien’s works, and at Jackson’s Lord of the Rings trilogy.

Rip-offs and Tributes: A Look at Derivative Works

picture of copy machine

Imitation is the sincerest form of flattery.  Isn’t that how an article about derivative works is supposed to begin?  We only ask because there are probably other articles out there on this topic that begin the same way.  Whether or not we admit it to ourselves, 100% true originality in the case of media like books, film, music and games is practically unheard of.  That’s not a bad thing; works that build on one another can be some of the richest experiences imaginable.  On the other hand, some people are just lazy and rip-off other, greater works.