Wise women

Nobel Prize Women in Science: Their Lives, Struggles, and Momentous Discoveries

By Sharon McGrayne Bertsch

Go to catalog

Discusses the lives of these women: Marie Sklodowska Curie -- Lise Meitner -- Emmy Noether -- Gerty Rednitz Cori -- Irene Joliet Curie --Barbara McClintock -- Maria Goeppert Mayer -- Rita Levi-Montalcini --Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkin -- Chien-Shiung Wu -- Gertrude Elion -- Rosalind Franklin -- Rosalyn Sussman Yalow -- Jocelyn Bell Burnell.
Our print copy is a first edition. The second editon (1998) is available as an eBook.

Reserve this title

Winners: Women and the Nobel Prize

By Barbara Shiels

Go to catalog

Though copyrighted in 1985, this book still is useful for it contains biographies of eight women who have won the Prize to that date.

Reserve this title

A Vision of Light by Judith Merkle Riley

In A Vision of Light, Margaret Kendall of Ashbury is a young and beautiful housewife living in 14th-century England. She is the mother of two healthy children, loved, and surrounded by many luxuries, but there is one thing more Margaret wishes, and her doting merchant husband is pleased to indulge her. Yet it is such a shocking thing that it is a harder wish to grant than a ring of rubies. Margaret wishes to write a book.

There are many difficulties. Of course, Margaret can not write--or read, for that matter—so she must find someone willing to take down her words. Three clerics refuse her, but they snigger as they point out their compatriot. Tattered, starving, and arrogant, Brother Gregory takes the job--which comes with frequent visits to Margaret’s well-stocked table. But he does so very grudgingly. What could such a feather-headed female have to say that is worth the expense of setting it down on vellum? A monk-in-training should be writing down great deeds and high-minded, philosophical points—not recipes and domestic notions.

A Grimm Tale and a True One

The Magic Circle by Donna Jo Napoli

"Don't you love it, Mother? We can shut our eyes and pretend we live in a candy house. All candy. Everywhere."

The Ugly One remembered how her child loved sweets. Asa was beautiful, and her mother tried to give her all the beauty she could though they were poor.

Braveheart and the Forestwife

The King's Swift Rider: A Novel on Robert the Bruce by Mollie Hunter

From where he stood on the hill above the valley, Martin Crawford saw that the leader of the war band was in serious trouble. When a hunting horn sounded from behind, the leader ordered his men to scatter before the onslaught of English soldiers. They were on him in moments, but their numbers broke as they chased the leader's scattered men. In all his sixteen years, Martin had never seen a man fight as this one did, swinging his great sword beside his companions until the last living enemy fled in fear.