Food

The End of Food

By Paul Roberts

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The bestselling author of "The End of Oil" turns his attention to food and finds that the system entrusted with meeting one of the most basic needs is dramatically failing us. With his trademark comprehensive global approach, Roberts investigates the startling truth about the modern food system. (Catalog summary)
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American Wasteland: How America Throws Away Nearly Half of its Food (and What We Can Do About It)

By Jonathan Bloom

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As more people are going hungry while simultaneously more people are morbidly obese, American Wasteland sheds light on the history, culture, and mindset of waste while exploring the parallel eco-friendly and sustainable-food movements. (From the catalog summary)
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Time to Get Popping

Popcorn was grown by Native Americans long before the Europeans came to the New World. The Aztecs used it, strung into garlands, in their religious ceremonies. Peruvians toasted and ate their popcorn, which was called pisancalla. During the 1830's, it was "discovered" by American farmers who, using a new kind of plow, planted acres and acres of it during the 1850s. By the turn of the 19th century, popcorn vendors could be found in every big city. They'd sell their wares by the bag or the ball and make a profit of about 70 cents on every dollar!

Corn

By Gail Gibbons

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Popcorn, corn on the cob, corn dogs, cornflakes--corn is used in many favorite foods. This book offers up the history of corn as well as the details concerning planting, cultivation, harvesting, and its many uses. A cornucopia of information about a popular farm product.

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Strawberry Time

Kids have a big advantage when it comes to picking strawberries because they grow close to the ground. With just a little know-how, you can be a berry good berry picker.

Tips for picking terrific berries:

  • Break the stem about a half an inch from the top of the berry.
  • Don't pick berries that are mushy-soft, nibbled on by insects or birds, green or pink
  • Don't pile your berries in a big bucket. Strawberries are heavy and have delicate skins. They can get bruised if they are piled thick, one on top of another.
  • Keep your berries cool, either in the shade or the refrigerator.
  • Don't wash them until you are ready to use them.
  • If you are going to eat your strawberries right away, you can go picking any time.
  • If you need your berries to last for longer, try to pick in the morning or in the early evening when it's cooler.
  • Wear a hat and sunscreen so you don't become red as a berry yourself.

Strawberries taste wonderfully good and are high in vitamin C, which helps your body heal, resist infections, and keeps your bones, gums, and teeth healthy. There are lots of ways to enjoy strawberries: in muffins, jam, salad, salsa, and simply by themselves.

Ladyfingers and Nun's Tummies: A Lighthearted Look at How Foods Got Their Names

By Martha Barnette

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Etymological history told in whimsical tales of how hundreds of foods, such as graham crackers and lettuce, have been named.

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Stop That Pickle!

By Peter Armour

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A pickle tries to escape being eaten by fleeing through the city streets, pursued by a variety of other food items. Suggested for ages 8-12.
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Arnie the Doughnut

By Laurie Keller

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Arnie the talking doughnut convinces Mr. Bing that not all doughnuts are meant to be eaten. Suggested for ages 4-8.
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Arnie the Doughnut

By Laurie Keller

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Arnie the talking doughnut convinces Mr. Bing that not all doughnuts are meant to be eaten. Suggested for ages 4-8.
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Picnic

By Emily Arnold McCully

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A little mouse gets lost on the way to a family picnic. Suggested for ages 3-6.
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