2017 Youth Media Award Winners

2017 Youth Media Award Winners

The ALSC (Association for Library Service to Children) media awards are announced every January during the American Library Association Midwinter Meeting. Read about the winners and honorable mentions below. The Youth Media Awards, announced in January include several awards for teen literature as well. 
 

2017 Newbery Medal Winner

The Newbery Medal is awarded for the most outstanding contribution to children's literature the previous year.
 

The Girl Who Drank the Moon
The Girl Who Drank the Moon
 by Kelly Barnhill 

Every year, the people of the Protectorate leave a baby as an offering to the witch who lives in the forest. They hope this sacrifice will keep her from terrorizing their town. But the witch in the forest, Xan, is kind and gentle. She shares her home with a wise Swamp Monster named Glerk, and a Perfectly Tiny Dragon, Fyrian. Xan rescues the abandoned children and delivers them to welcoming families on the other side of the forest, nourishing the babies with starlight on the journey. One year, Xan accidentally feeds a baby moonlight instead of starlight, filling the ordinary child with extraordinary magic. The acclaimed author of The Witch's Boy has created another epic coming-of-age fairy tale destined to become a modern classic.

 


2017 Newbery Honor Books
 

Freedom Over Me book cover
Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life written and illustrated by Ashley Bryan 
Using a document from 1828 that lists the value of a U.S. landowner's 11 slaves, Ashley Bryan creates distinct personalities and voices for each, painting their portraits and imagining their dreams. His portraits show the men, women, and children gazing out at readers, the contours of their faces traced as if carved from wood, while strong rhythmic outlines mimic stained glass, echoing the sense of sacred memory. There are few first-person accounts of slaves, and these imagined words will strike a chord with even the youngest readers.


 

The Inquisitor’s Tale book cover

The Inquisitor’s Tale, Or, The Three Magical Children and Their Holy Dog by Adam Gidwitz and illustrated by Hatem Aly
Crossing paths at an inn, 13th-century travels impart the tales of a monastery oblate, a Jewish refugee, and a psychic peasant girl with a loyal greyhound, who join forces while running from persecution.
 

 


 

Wolf Hollow book cover
Wolf Hollow by Lauren Wolk
Eleven-year-old Annabelle lives in a rural Pennsylvania community in 1943. The continued fighting of World War II haunts everyone, but life is mostly peaceful—until Betty Glengarry's arrival. Betty is cruel and threatening and thrives on inflicting pain. At first, Annabelle is slightly comforted to know that Toby is watching out for her. Toby is a local vagabond, a World War I veteran of few words who has become something like a friend of Annabelle's family. Meanwhile, Betty's violent malice only grows, until one day she goes missing. Toby immediately becomes the prime suspect in Betty's disappearance. Annabelle is sure of Toby's innocence and is determined to prove it. 

 


The Caldecott Medal
The Randolph Caldecott Medal is for the most distinguished American picture book for children.

2017 Caldecott Winner

Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, witten and illustrated by Javaka SteptoeRadiant Child book cover
Jean-Michel Basquiat and his unique, collage-style paintings rocketed to fame in the 1980s as a cultural phenomenon unlike anything the art world had ever seen. But before that, he was a little boy who saw art everywhere: in poetry books and museums, in games and in the words that we speak, and in the pulsing energy of New York City. Now, award-winning illustrator Javaka Steptoe's vivid text and bold artwork echoing Basquiat's own introduce young readers to the powerful message that art doesn't always have to be neat or clean—and definitely not inside the lines—to be beautiful.


2017 Caldecott Honor Books

Du Iz Tak? book cover



Du Iz Tak?, written and illustrated by Carson Ellis
Readers are invited to imagine the dramatic possibilities to be found in the natural world, even the humblest backyard garden! With exquisitely detailed illustration that will appeal to children and art-lovers alike and a wonderfully playful invented language, we soon find ourselves speaking "Bug" ... Du iz tak? What is that?





Freedom in Congo Square book cover


Freedom in Congo Square, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie and written by Carole Boston Weatherford
As slaves relentlessly toiled in an unjust system in 19th-century Louisiana, they all counted down the days until Sunday, when at least for half a day they were briefly able to congregate in Congo Square in New Orleans. Here they were free to set up an open market, sing, dance, and play music. They were free to forget their cares, their struggles, and their oppression. This story chronicles slaves' duties each day, from chopping logs on Mondays to baking bread on Wednesdays to plucking hens on Saturday, and builds to the freedom of Sundays and the special experience of an afternoon spent in Congo Square.



Leave Me Alone! book cover



Leave Me Alone! illustrated and written by Vera Brosgol
Grandmother wants so badly to be left alone to finish the knitting for her grandchildren that she leaves her tiny home and her big family to journey to the Moon and beyond to find peace and quiet to finish her knitting.



 

They All Saw a Cat book cover

They All Saw a Cat
, illustrated and written by Brendan Wenzel

In simple, rhythmic prose and stylized pictures, a cat walks through the world, and all the other creatures see and acknowledge the cat. Read a review of They All Saw a Cat here.

 


Coretta Scott King AwardCoretta Scott King (Author) Book Award Winners

Coretta Scott King (Author) Book Award recognizing an African-American author and illustrator of outstanding books for children and young adults. 

As Brave As You


As Brave as You, written by Jason Reynolds
When two brothers decide to prove how brave they are, everything backfires—literally.


 

Freedom Over Me book cover
Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life written and illustrated by Ashley Bryan 
Using a document from 1828 that lists the value of a U.S. landowner's 11 slaves, Ashley Bryan creates distinct personalities and voices for each, painting their portraits and imagining their dreams. His portraits show the men, women, and children gazing out at readers, the contours of their faces traced as if carved from wood, while strong rhythmic outlines mimic stained glass, echoing the sense of sacred memory. There are few first-person accounts of slaves, and these imagined words will strike a chord with even the youngest readers.
 

 


Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Book Award Winner
 

Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat, witten and illustrated by Javaka SteptoeRadiant Child book cover
Jean-Michel Basquiat and his unique, collage-style paintings rocketed to fame in the 1980s as a cultural phenomenon unlike anything the art world had ever seen. But before that, he was a little boy who saw art everywhere: in poetry books and museums, in games and in the words that we speak, and in the pulsing energy of New York City. Now, award-winning illustrator Javaka Steptoe's vivid text and bold artwork echoing Basquiat's own introduce young readers to the powerful message that art doesn't always have to be neat or clean—and definitely not inside the lines—to be beautiful.

 

 

Coretta Scott King (Illustrator) Award Honor Books

Freedom in Congo Square book cover


Freedom in Congo Square, illustrated by R. Gregory Christie and written by Carole Boston Weatherford
As slaves relentlessly toiled in an unjust system in 19th-century Louisiana, they all counted down the days until Sunday, when at least for half a day they were briefly able to congregate in Congo Square in New Orleans. Here they were free to set up an open market, sing, dance, and play music. They were free to forget their cares, their struggles, and their oppression. This story chronicles slaves' duties each day, from chopping logs on Mondays to baking bread on Wednesdays to plucking hens on Saturday, and builds to the freedom of Sundays and the special experience of an afternoon spent in Congo Square.

 

Freedom Over Me book cover
Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life written and illustrated by Ashley Bryan 
Using a document from 1828 that lists the value of a U.S. landowner's 11 slaves, Ashley Bryan creates distinct personalities and voices for each, painting their portraits and imagining their dreams. His portraits show the men, women, and children gazing out at readers, the contours of their faces traced as if carved from wood, while strong rhythmic outlines mimic stained glass, echoing the sense of sacred memory. There are few first-person accounts of slaves, and these imagined words will strike a chord with even the youngest readers.
 

 

In Plain Sight


In Plain Sight
, illustrated by Jerry Pinkney and written by Richard Jackson
An ailing grandfather and his helpful granddaughter play a unique game of seek and find.



 


Schneider Family Book AwardSchneider Family Book Award

Schneider Family Book Award for books that embody an artistic expression of the disability experience.

 

Six Dots

Six Dots: A Story of Young Louis Braille, written by Jen Bryant and illustrated by Boris KulikovLouis Braille was just five years old when he lost his sight. He was a clever boy, determined to live like everyone else, and what he wanted more than anything was to be able to read. Even at the school for the blind in Paris, there were no books for him. And so he invented his own alphabet—a whole new system for writing that could be read by touch. A system so ingenious that it is still used by the blind community today.

 

As Brave As You


As Brave as You
, written by Jason Reynolds

When two brothers decide to prove how brave they are, everything backfires—literally.

 

 

 


 

Theodor Seuss Geisel AwardThe Theodor Seuss Geisel Award is given to author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished American book for beginning readers.

2017 Geisel Award Winner

We Are Growing! book cover

We Are Growing! written by Laurie Keller 
Walt is not the tallest or the curliest or the pointiest or even the crunchiest. A confounded blade of grass searches for his 'est' in this hilarious story about growing up.
 

2017 Geisel Honor Books


Go, Otto, Go! book cover


Go Otto Go!
 written and illustrated by David Milgrim

Otto the robot builds a spaceship to take him home.

 



 
Good Night Owl book cover

Good Night Owl, written and illustrated by Greg Pizzoli

As owl is going to sleep, he is repeatedly interrupted by a "squeek". Determined to find its source, Owl tears apart his house from cupboard to floorboard to roof.




The Infamous Ratsos book cover



The Infamous Ratsos, written by Kara LaReau and illustrated by Matt Myers
Rat brothers Louie and Ralphie Ratso try to prove they can be as rough and tough as their father in the Big City, but every time they try to show how tough they are, they end up accidentally doing good deeds instead.

 




Oops, Pounce, Quick, Run! An Alphabet Caper book cover

 

Oops, Pounce, Quick, Run! An Alphabet Caper, written and illustrated by Mike Twohy
When a bouncing ball wakes a sleeping mouse, it's just the beginning of an alphabet adventure.


 


The Odyssey AwardThe Odyssey Award is given to the producer of the best audiobook for children and/or young adults, available in English in the United States.

2017 Odyssey Award Winner

Anna and the Swallow Man is written by Gavriel Savit, narrated by Allan Corduner, and produced by Penguin Random House Audio Publishing GroupsAnna and the Swallow Man audiobook cover
1939. A million marching soldiers and a thousand barking dogs. This is no place to grow up. Anna Łania is just seven years old when the Germans take her father, a linguistics professor, during their purge of intellectuals in Poland. She's alone. And then Anna meets the Swallow Man. He is a mystery, strange and tall, a skilled deceiver with more than a little magic up his sleeve. And when the soldiers in the streets look at him, they see what he wants them to see. The Swallow Man is not Anna's father—she knows that very well—but she also knows that and, like her father, he's in danger of being taken, and like her father, he has a gift for languages: Polish, Russian, German, Yiddish, even Bird. When he summons a bright, beautiful swallow down to his hand to stop her from crying, Anna is entranced. She follows him into the wilderness. Over the course of their travels together, Anna and the Swallow Man will dodge bombs, tame soldiers, and even, despite their better judgment, make a friend. But in a world gone mad, everything can prove dangerous. Even the Swallow Man.


2017 Odyssey Award Honor Books
 

Dream on Amber audiobook cover

Dream On, Amber
, written by Emma Shevah, narrated by Laura Kirman, and produced by Recorded Books 

Amber's Japanese father left when she was little, and her sister Bella was just a baby, so now she fills in the frustrating gap in her life with imagined conversations and writes letters to Bella that seem to come from their father.


 

Ghost book cover

Ghost
, written by Jason Reynolds, narrated by Guy Lockard, and produced by Simon and Schuster Audio

Ghost, a naturally talented runner and troublemaker, is recruited for an elite middle school track team. He must stay on track, literally and figuratively, to reach his full potential. 


 

Nimona book cover
Nimona
, written by Noelle Stevenson, narrated by Rebecca Soler, Jonathan Davis, Marc Thompson, January LaVoy, Natalie Gold, Peter Bradbury, and David Pittu, and produced by HarperAudio

Nimona is an impulsive young shape-shifter with a knack for villainy. Lord Ballister Blackheart is a villain with a vendetta. As sidekick and supervillain, Nimona and Lord Blackheart are about to wreak some serious havoc. Their mission: prove to the kingdom that Sir Ambrosius Goldenloin and his buddies at the Institution of Law Enforcement and Heroics aren't the heroes everyone thinks they are. But as small acts of mischief escalate into a vicious battle, Lord Blackheart realizes that Nimona's powers are as murky and mysterious as her past. And her unpredictable wild side might be more dangerous than he is willing to admit.
 


The Batchelder AwardThe Mildred L. Batchelder Award is given to the most outstanding children’s book originally published in a language other than English in a country other than the United States and subsequently translated into English for publication in the United States.
 

2017 Mildred L. Batchelder Award WinnerCry, Heart, But Never Break book cover


Cry, Heart, But Never Break, written by Glenn Ringtved, illustrated by Charlotte Pardi, translated from the Danish by Robert Moulthrop, and produced by Enchanted Lion Books.
Aware their grandmother is gravely ill, four siblings make a pact to keep Death from taking her away. But Death does arrive all the same, as he must. He comes gently, naturally. And he comes with enough time to share a story with the children that helps them to realize the value of loss to life and the importance of being able to say goodbye.


Batchelder Honor Books

Over the Ocean book cover

Over the Ocean, written and illustrated by Taro Gomi and translated from Japanese by Taylor Norman

This book was originally published in Japanese in 1979 as Umi no Mukô wa. Using spare text. Using spare text and vivid illustrations, this wistful picture book invites wonder about the broader world beyond the horizon of what is known. A child poses questions that
poses contemplative questions about people, places and the possibility that someone somewhere might be just like you.  



 
As Time Went By book coverAs Time Went By, written and illustrated by José Sanabria and translated from the German by Audrey Hall
Originally published in German in 2016 as Wie die Zeit vergeht or As Time Went By was written and illustrated by José Sanabria and translated by Audrey Hall. Once upon a time, there was a ship, a family and a village that each underwent changes. Told in three parts through watercolor illustrations and spare text, this story follows the ship from grand to abandoned, a family from rich to poor, and a village of homeless people from despair to joy as they find a new home within the railings of the transformed ship.


The Ballad of a Broken Nose book cover


The Ballad of a Broken Nose, written by Arne Svingen and translated from the Norwegian by Kari Dickson
Originally published in Norwegian in 2012 as Sangen om en Brukkt Nese or The Ballad of a Broken Nose was written by Arne Svingen and translated by Kari Dickson. Bart, a quirky Norwegian 13-year-old, faces many challenges: an alcoholic, overweight mother who loves him dearly; life in a run-down apartment; classmates who bully him and break his nose; and boxing lessons he takes to toughen himself—all juxtaposed with his desire to become an opera singer!


 


Pura Belpre AwardThe Pura Belpré Award, is presented annually to a Latino/Latina writer and illustrator whose work best portrays, affirms, and celebrates the Latino cultural experience in an outstanding work of literature for children and youth.
 

2017 Pura Belpré (Author) Award WinnerJuana and Lucas book cover



Juana & Lucas, written and illustrated by Juana Medina, and published by Candlewick Press
A spunky young girl from Colombia loves playing with her canine best friend and resists boring school activities, especially learning English, until her family tells her that a special trip is planned to an English-speaking place.


Pura Belpré (Author) Honor Book
 

The Only Road book cover




The Only Road, written by Alexandra Diaz
Jaime and his cousin Ángela undertake the arduous journey to the North after a gang in Guatemala threatens their family. Diaz portrays with empathy the dangers, decisions and regrets faced by unaccompanied minors as they migrate in search of refuge.  


 

 

2017 Pura Belpré (Illustrator) Award WinnerLowriders to the Center of the Earth book cover


Lowriders to the Center of the Earth, illustrated by Raúl Gonzalez and written by Cathy Camper
Lowriders to the Center of the Earth follows Lupe Impala, El Chavo Flapjack and Elirio Malaria, as they lowride into an epic quest to the realm of Mictlantecuhtli, Aztec god of the Underworld. The ballpoint pen art creates a fantastical borderlands odyssey, packed with subversively playful cultural references that affirm a vibrant Chicanx cultura. 
 

Pura Belpré (Illustrator) Honor Book
 

Esquivel!: Space-Age Sound Artist book cover


Esquivel! Space-Age Sound Artist, illustrated by Duncan Tonatiuh and written by Susan Wood
Juan Garcia Esquivel was born in Mexico and grew up to the sounds of mariachi bands. He loved music and became a musical explorer. Defying convention, he created music that made people laugh and planted images in their minds. Juan's space-age lounge music, popular in the 50s and 60s, has has found a new generation of listeners.


 

The Princess and the Warrior: A Tale of Two Volcanoes book cover
The Princess and the Warrior: A Tale of Two Volcanoes
,
 illustrated and written by Duncan Tonatiuh
Award-winning author Duncan Tonatiuh reimagines one of Mexico's cherished legends. Princess Izta had many wealthy suitors but dismissed them all. When a mere warrior, Popoca, promised to be true to her and stay always by her side, Izta fell in love. The emperor promised Popoca that if he could defeat their enemy Jaguar Claw, then Popoca and Izta could wed. When Popoca was near to defeating Jaguar Claw, his opponent sent a messenger to Izta saying Popoca was dead. Izta fell into a deep sleep and, upon his return, even Popoca could not wake her. As promised Popoca stayed by her side.

 


Andrew Carnegie Medal The Andrew Carnegie Medal honors the most outstanding video productions for children.
 

2017 Andrew Carnegie Medal Award WinnerDrum Dream Girl book cover

Drum Dream Girl: How One Girl’s Courage Changed Music, by Ryan Swenar of Dreamscape Media
Follows a young Cuban girl in the 1930s as she strives to become a drummer, despite being continually reminded that only boys play the drums, and that there's never been a female drummer in Cuba. Includes notes about Millo Castro Zaldarriaga, who inspired the story, and Anacaona, the all-girl dance band she formed with her sisters.

 

 


Robert F. Sibert Informational Book MedalThe Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal is awarded annually to the author(s) and illustrator(s) of the most distinguished informational book published in the United States in English during the preceding year. The award is named in honor of Robert F. Sibert, the long-time President of Bound to Stay Bound Books, Inc. of Jacksonville, Illinois. 
 

2017 Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Medal Award Winner
 

March: Book Three, written by John Lewis and Andrew Aydin, illustrated by Nate Powell March: Book Three book cover
This graphic novel trilogy is a first-hand account of Congressman John Lewis' lifelong struggle for civil and human rights, meditating in the modern age on the distance traveled since the days of Jim Crow and segregation. Rooted in Lewis' personal story, it also reflects on the highs and lows of the broader civil rights movement. Book one spans Lewis' youth in rural Alabama, his life-changing meeting with Martin Luther King, Jr., the birth of the Nashville Student Movement and their battle to tear down segregation through nonviolent lunch counter sit-ins, building to a stunning climax on the steps of City Hall. Book two takes place after the Nashville sit-in campaign. His commitment to justice and nonviolence has taken him from an Alabama sharecropper's farm to the halls of Congress, from a segregated schoolroom to the 1963 March on Washington D.C., and from receiving beatings from state troopers to receiving the Medal of Freedom, awarded to him by Barack Obama, the first African American president.

 

2017 Robert F. Sibert Informational Honor Books


Giant Squid book cover




Giant Squid, written by Candace Fleming, illustrated by Eric Rohmann
A nonfiction picture book exploring the mysterious life of the elusive giant squid.

 

 


Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor's Story book cover

Sachiko: A Nagasaki Bomb Survivor’s Story, written by Caren Stelson

50 years after surviving the atomic bombing of Nagasaki as a six-year-old, Sachiko Yasui began to share her story. This moving work of creative nonfiction offers Yasui's account of life in wartime Japan, the "unspeakable seconds" of the bombing, her family's struggle to survive, the deaths of her siblings from radiation sickness, her thyroid cancer, and her decades-long struggle to find words as a hibakusha, a survivor of the bombing. 


 

Uprooted book cover
Uprooted: The Japanese American Experience During World War II, written by Albert Marrin 

Just 75 years ago, the American government did something that most would consider unthinkable today: it rounded up over 100,000 of its own citizens based on nothing more than their ancestry and, suspicious of their loyalty, kept them in concentration camps for the better part of four years. How could this have happened? Uprooted takes a close look at the history of racism in America and follows the treacherous path that led one of our nation's most beloved presidents to make this decision. Meanwhile, it illuminates the history of Japan and its own struggles with racism and xenophobia, which led to the bombing of Pearl Harbor, ultimately tying the two countries together.

 

We Will Not Be Silent book cover
We Will Not Be Silent: The White Rose Student Resistance Movement That Defied Adolf Hitler
, written by Russell Freedman

In his signature eloquent prose, backed up by thorough research, Russell Freedman tells the story of Austrian-born Hans Scholl and his sister Sophie. They belonged to Hitler Youth as young children but began to doubt the Nazi regime. As older students, the Scholls and a few friends formed the White Rose, a campaign of active resistance to Hitler and the Nazis. Risking imprisonment or even execution, the White Rose members distributed leaflets urging Germans to defy the Nazi government. Their belief that freedom was worth dying for will inspire young readers to stand up for what they believe in.
 

Freedom Over Me book cover
Freedom Over Me: Eleven Slaves, Their Lives and Dreams Brought to Life written and illustrated by Ashley Bryan 
Using a document from 1828 that lists the value of a U.S. landowner's 11 slaves, Ashley Bryan creates distinct personalities and voices for each, painting their portraits and imagining their dreams. His portraits show the men, women, and children gazing out at readers, the contours of their faces traced as if carved from wood, while strong rhythmic outlines mimic stained glass, echoing the sense of sacred memory. There are few first-person accounts of slaves, and these imagined words will strike a chord with even the youngest readers.