Hunter’s Iron Works

By Jerrilynn Eby James Hunter (1721-1784) was the son of James Hunter, merchant of Duns, Scotland. His uncle, William Hunter, settled in Virginia in the 1730s and was one of the first Scottish merchants to settle in the Fredericksburg area. James was brought up in the mercantile business and soon began making business trips to…
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From Pearl Harbor to Midway

By Steve Johnson In the summer of 1942, the Japanese were winning their war with the United States. They had sunk or crippled America's battleship fleet at Pearl Harbor and snapped up a chain of islands across the Pacific which could, if fortified, form an impenetrable barrier to the U.S. Navy. Now the Imperial Japanese…
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Downtown Hotels Abounded in the 19th Century

By Barbara Crookshanks Today, Fredericksburg ponders the building of a single downtown hotel, but during the 19th century, Fredericksburg was known as a town of hotels. Some were large and elegant. Some catered to specific clienteles. All left their mark on Fredericksburg’s history. Most people traveling from Washington to points south stopped over in Fredericksburg…
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Shiloh Cemetery Graves

Collected by Robert Hodge Local historian Robert Hodge reported in 1981 that this information is from a report prepared by students of Germanna Community College circa 1979. The report is not verified and was unsigned. Indeed, there is a variation in the name Bumbrey - represented as Bumbray here, but there are stones with Bumbrey…
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Walk Through History . . . Mill Sites and Water Power

From the Greater Fredericksburg Tourism Partnership INTRODUCTION Fredericksburg is located at the falls of the Rappahannock River - the point where the flat, sandy, coastal plain meets the hilly, rocky piedmont to the west. This is where the river becomes unnavigable - rocky rapids and shallow waters make its channel impassable to vessels. However, this…
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That Time When Salvador Dalí, Henry Miller, and Anaïs Nin Lived Together in Caroline County (Spoiler Alert: They Did Not Get Along Well.)

By Dan Enos Home to sprawling plantations, the even more sprawling Fort A.P. Hill, and historic sites such as assassin John Wilkes Booth’s death place and explorer William Clark’s birthplace, Caroline County is an archetypal rural Virginia county, far closer in spirit to the somnolent Clayton County from Margaret Mitchell’s Gone With the Wind than the avant-garde…
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Mary Ball Washington: “His Revered Mother”

By Barbara Crookshanks Fredericksburg's Mary Ball Washington was an intrepid 18th-century woman who raised five children alone. The oldest became the first President of the United States. Mary Washington's name and heritage are alive and well in the Fredericksburg area and beyond. Her home is at the corner of Lewis and Charles streets; the Mary Washington Monument is on…
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