Book Corner: Tales show what can happen when you follow your passion

In March, to celebrate Women’s History month, I’ve taken some time to focus on children’s books written about creative women who followed their passions. These women’s combinations of skill, artistry, and drive led them all to achieve personal goals as well as to make significant contributions to their creative fields. Fancy Party Gowns: The Story of…
View More about Book Corner: Tales show what can happen when you follow your passion

Book Corner: Kids Can Read About Kids in These Inspiring Picture Books

By Darcie Caswell February is Black History Month and presents a great opportunity to highlight stories by and about African Americans. As a reader and a librarian, I am delighted at the increase in children’s books published each year by and about African Americans, giving us more books about influential individuals like scientists, artists, and…
View More about Book Corner: Kids Can Read About Kids in These Inspiring Picture Books

A Spy Called James: The True Story of James Lafayette, Revolutionary War Double Agent

James was a slave in Virginia when the American Revolution began. Wanting to earn his freedom while helping the new country, he volunteered for the Revolutionary Army, with the promise of his freedom at the war’s end—if the Americans were victorious. He was assigned to work for the young and brilliant French commander who was…
View More about A Spy Called James: The True Story of James Lafayette, Revolutionary War Double Agent

Westmoreland County’s African American History

Westmoreland County’s African American history dates back to the 17th century. During the earliest years, both slaves from Africa and white indentured servants were imported to the Northern Neck (the land between the Potomac and Rappahannock rivers) to work on farms and plantations, with African slaves becoming more prevalent over time.  17th Century – The…
View More about Westmoreland County’s African American History

Book Corner: Celebrating Black History Month with Books

Black History Month means much more than celebrating the overcoming of adversity. It is much more than commending the change-makers and the activists. These are certainly important, but it’s also about embracing the everyday joy, passion, and culture of African American heritage. There are many ways to participate in Black History Month (year-round, not just in…
View More about Book Corner: Celebrating Black History Month with Books

Gayle Middle School Students Create Model Traffic Signal

By Nathan Sekinger, Gayle Middle School, and Darcie Caswell, Central Rappahannock Regional Library. To recognize early contributions of African American inventors in the areas of science, technology, engineering, and math, Central Rappahannock Regional Library is rotating a series of interactive activities through the children’s areas of all branches through the end of February. As part…
View More about Gayle Middle School Students Create Model Traffic Signal

African-American History of Stafford, Virginia

Colonial Times Africans first arrived in the Virginia colony in 1619 as indentured servants. In the late 1600s, slaves were brought into the sparsely settled Rappahannock Valley, primarily to serve as agricultural laborers. As the colony grew, Falmouth and Fredericksburg, situated on the Rappahannock River at the limits of inland navigation, became important seaports. Seagoing…
View More about African-American History of Stafford, Virginia

If you like Hidden Figures

Before a computer became an inanimate object and before Sputnik changed the course of history, before the Supreme Court case Brown v. Board of Education established that separate was in fact not equal, and before the poetry of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech rang out over the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, a…
View More about If you like Hidden Figures
1 - 10 of 19