Walk Through History . . . Caroline Street

By the Fredericksburg Area Tourism Department 130 Caroline Built c. 1855. The style and design of this Greek Revival townhouse are identical to its neighboring duplexes, although this is a single family dwelling. Extensive changes have altered the architectural similarities shared with 132-138. Note bay window and wing additions. 132,134,136,138 Caroline Built 1855. These Greek Revival townhouses are mirror images…
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The Aquia Train Robbery

This account has been compiled from the Free Lance newspaper of Fredericksburg, Virginia, October 16, 1894, through September 27, 1895, by Robert A. Hodge. Charles Jasper Searcey was born in Palopinto County, Texas, December 12, 1858. He grew into a tall, slender, wiry man with well-developed shoulders, deep-set dark eyes, a low but pleasant voice, and…
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Early Ice Houses

By Roy Butler The inhabitants of early Fredericksburg enjoyed a cool drink during the hot summer months, just as we do today - hence the massive excavations referred to as ice houses. These brick-lined, wood-floored structures were generally 15 to 20 feet in depth and 12 to 15 feet in diameter. Dairy products, meats, and…
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History of the Rappahannock River

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library The Civil War on the River Lines of Virginia, 1862-1864 "Trask argues that the bloody engagements on the river lines were the most important battles of the Civil War in the East, far surpassing even the dramatic contests at Antietam and Gettysburg in significance. During the Civil War, the…
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Hunter’s Iron Works

By Jerrilynn Eby James Hunter (1721-1784) was the son of James Hunter, merchant of Duns, Scotland. His uncle, William Hunter, settled in Virginia in the 1730s and was one of the first Scottish merchants to settle in the Fredericksburg area. James was brought up in the mercantile business and soon began making business trips to…
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A Female Soldier in the Civil War: Emma E. Edmonds

By Christie Hoerneman Historians believe at least 400 women served in the Civil War as soldiers, but documented cases are very few. One woman who served with a Michigan regiment and witnessed the Battle of Fredericksburg, Emma Edmonds, documented her time serving with Company F, the Flint Union Greys, of the Second Michigan Infantry Volunteers by writing…
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Downtown Hotels Abounded in the 19th Century

By Barbara Crookshanks Today, Fredericksburg ponders the building of a single downtown hotel, but during the 19th century, Fredericksburg was known as a town of hotels. Some were large and elegant. Some catered to specific clienteles. All left their mark on Fredericksburg’s history. Most people traveling from Washington to points south stopped over in Fredericksburg…
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Shiloh Cemetery Graves

Collected by Robert Hodge Local historian Robert Hodge reported in 1981 that this information is from a report prepared by students of Germanna Community College circa 1979. The report is not verified and was unsigned. Indeed, there is a variation in the name Bumbrey - represented as Bumbray here, but there are stones with Bumbrey…
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