Local History

History Blog

Thu, 07/21/2016 - 9:54am

From The Fredericksburg News, Thursday, January 10, 1878

 THE ICE HARVEST is a large one, and the business activity of the past few days to gather it in, has been a stirring scene on our wintry streets. Men and horses, waggons and carts, have improved the fleeting hours in the most rapid manner and the rumble of wheels over the icy ground has been unceasing from morning till night. Mr. A. P. Rowe's pond has furnished a large amount of excellent ice, about five inches thick, and all the Ice houses in town and country will be filled with this indispensable luxury, of home production this Season.

Sat, 07/16/2016 - 1:41pm
A Journal of the Plague Year by Daniel Defoe

What would really happen if thousands of people died in a city every day from an illness? Even worse, a city with few to no hospitals and only a bare bones emergency infrastructure? When the illness might leave no mark on a person until he or she fell over dead in front of you? And that’s when you realize, you have been exposed and could be next. What would you do?

Fri, 07/08/2016 - 9:45am
Verifying Native American Ancestry through DNA Testing

“Great-Grandma said we have an Indian princess in the family . . . . “  

Since DNA testing for genealogy began nearly 20 years ago, we have made many leaps and bounds with how, when, and why it can be used. Many Americans have a family story that features the marriage of a Native American into the lineage. Frequently, these stories make us wonder about who we are on the inside.

On Tuesday, August 2, at 7:00, Shannon Combs-Bennett, biologist and genealogist, will discuss what DNA testing could tell you about your ancestry, as well as which test you may want to take to verify your genealogy. An author and frequent lecturer on genealogy, Shannon will present her talk in support of the library’s Native Voices: Native Peoples’ Concepts of Health and Wellness exhibition.

Fri, 07/08/2016 - 10:47am
When in Tsenacommacah, Do as the Powhatans

Did Native American barbecue contribute to the success of the English colony at Jamestown?  According to author, historical barbecue consultant, and Patawomeck Indian Tribe member Joe Haynes, the answer is yes! Joe will visit the Headquarters Library on Wednesday, August 3.

He will draw upon numerous historical and contemporary sources to explore some of the lesser-known contributions made to Virginia’s culture and cookery by the Powhatan Indians, who called their land Tsenacommacah. According to Joe, many Virginian foods known to us today, such as smoked pork, hoecakes, and barbecue, all exhibit the unmistakable influence of the Powhatans.

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