Civil War - U.S.

Lincoln in Stafford

By Jane Hollenbeck Conner

Go to catalog

The Civil War brought Lincoln to rural Stafford County, Virginia, six different times for a total of fourteen days. These visits in 1862 and 1863 are described as depicted in soldiers' letter, journals, newspaper articles, a war correspondent's notes, drawings and photographs.

Reserve this title

Sinners, Saints and Soldiers in Civil War Stafford

By Jane Hollenbeck Conner

Go to catalog

Over 135,000 Union soldiers came to Stafford during the Civil War. This book relates the stories of six unique individuals who visited the area. The writings of these soldiers, nurses, and civilians help paint a picture of what Stafford and Fredericksburg were like during this devastating war.
From the publisher's description

Reserve this title

Guide to the Battles of Chancellorsville & Fredericksburg

By Jay Luvaas and Harold W. Nelson, editors

Go to catalog
Eyewitness accounts by battle participants make these guides an invaluable resource for travelers and nontravelers who want a greater understanding of five of the most devastating yet influential years in our nation's history. Explicit directions to points of interest and maps--illustrating the action and showing the detail of troop position, roads, rivers, elevations, and tree lines as they were 130 years ago--help bring the battles to life. In the field, these guides can be used to recreate each battle's setting and proportions, giving the reader a sense of the tension and fear each soldier must have felt as he faced his enemy.
From the publisher's description

This book is part of the U.S. Army War College Guides to Civil War Battles series.

Reserve this title

The Spotsylvania Campaign

By Gary W. Gallagher, Editor

Go to catalog
In this comprehensive assessment of the Spotsylvania Campaign, top military historians examine one of the bloodiest clashes in the Civil War--the confrontation between Grant and Lee over a two-week period in May of 1864. 43 illustrations. 8 maps.
From the publisher's description
Reserve this title

The Spotsylvania Campaign: May 7-21, 1864

By John Cannan

Go to catalog
Spotsylvania was a dramatic clash between individual units and a desperate holding action fought by Robert E. Lee as the sands were running out for the Confederacy. This the story of one of the Civil War's most tragic battles and is enhanced by sidebars, specially commissioned maps, and detailed orders of battle and casualty figures based on recent research at the National Archives.
From the publisher's description
Reserve this title

The Battles for Spotsylvania Court House and the Road to Yellow Tavern, May 7-12, 1864

By Gordon C. Rhea

Go to catalog

The sequel to the author's The Battle of the Wilderness, May 5-6 1864, an award-winning account of the pivotal Civil War confrontation in Virginia recounts Lee's magnificent defense at Spotsylvania and Grant's costly attack.
From the publisher's description

Reserve this title

The Union Sixth Army Corps in the Chancellorsville Campaign: A Study of the Engagements of Second Fredericksburg, Salem Church, and Banks's Ford, May 3-4, 1863

By Philip W. Parsons

Go to catalog
This military history focuses on the battlefield engagements of the Union's Sixth Army Corps on May 3 and 4, 1863. Compiled from contemporary accounts and a variety of postwar histories, it examines the role that the Sixth Army Corps and its commander, Major General John Sedgwick, played in the Chancellorsville Campaign.
From the publisher's description.
Reserve this title

A Slave No More: Two Men Who Escaped to Freedom: Including Their Own Narratives of Emancipation

By David W. Blight, editor

Go to catalog

Through a combination of intelligence, daring, and sheer luck, the men reached the protection of occupying Union troops. Historian Blight prefaces the narratives with each man's life history. Using genealogical information, Blight has reconstructed their childhoods as sons of white slaveholders, their service as cooks and camp hands during the Civil War, and their climb to black working-class stability in the North, where they reunited their families. In the stories of Wallace Turnage and John Washington, we find portals that offer a rich new answer to the question of how four million people moved from slavery to freedom.
From the publisher's description.

Reserve this title

John Washington's Civil War: A Slave Narrative

By Crandall Shifflett, editor

Go to catalog

John Washington's recounting of his difficult years as a Virginia slave was made only seven years after his emancipation.

Reserve this title

Historic Churches of Fredericksburg: Houses of the Holy

By Michael Aubrecht

Go to catalog

Recalls stories of rebellion, racism and reconstruction as experienced by Secessionists, Unionists and the African American population in Fredericksburg's landmark churches during the Civil War and Reconstruction eras.
Using a wide variety of materials compiled from the local National Park archives, author Michael Aubrecht presents multiple perspectives from local believers and nonbelievers who witnessed the country's "Great Divide." Learn about the importance of faith in old Fredericksburg through the recollections of local clergy such as Reverend Tucker Lacy; excerpts from slave narratives as recorded by Joseph F. Walker; impressions of military commanders such as Robert E. Lee and "Stonewall" Jackson; and stories of the conflict over African-American membership.
From the publisher's description

Reserve this title