Civil War - U.S.

Virginia Horse Racing: Triumphs of the Turf

By Virginia C. Johnson and Barbara Crookshanks

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Virginia, mother of presidents, is also the mother of American horse racing. From the very beginning, Virginians have risked it all on the track as eagerly as on the battlefield. Follow the bloodlines of three foundation sires of the American Thoroughbred through generations of rollicking races and larger-than-life grandees wagering kingly stakes, sometimes on horses not yet born.
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Stafford County, Virginia: Veterans and Cemeteries

By Homer D. Musselman

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A useful resource for genealogists as well as those interested in military history.

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Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania Court House

By John F. Cummings III

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Fredericksburg and Spotsylvania County both witnessed the ravages of America's defining drama. This is the story of a town forced into exodus by the harsh hand of war and of the strength that helped its residents find rebirth from the ashes of destruction. This shared experience would bring people like John Henry Myer and Joseph Walker into a united community, despite diverse backgrounds and racial differences. Fredericksburg had enjoyed prosperity as a colonial-era tobacco port, but economic and agricultural changes diminished this importance.
By the 1850s, Fredericksburg had been eclipsed by Richmond to the south and Alexandria to the north. Shortly before the Civil War, a small industrial boom revitalized the town only to be cast asunder by the events of 1861-1865. Ten miles south is Spotsylvania Court House, the county seat. Here too, fate would deal a blow as warring armies raged over the pastoral setting, leaving destruction in their wake.
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Bloody Roads South: The Wilderness to Cold Harbor, May-June 1864

By Noah Andre Trudeau

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In this authoritative chronicle of the great 1864 Overland Campaign in Virginia, Noah Andre Trudeau vividly re-creates the brutal forty days that marked the beginning of the end of the Civil War. In riveting detail Trudeau traces the carnage from the initial battles in Virginia's Wilderness to the gruesome hand-to-hand combat at Spotsylvania's "Bloody Angle," to the ingenious trap laid by Lee at the North Anna River, to the killing ground of Cold Harbor.
Through fascinating eyewitness accounts, he relates the human stories behind this epic saga. Common soldiers struggle to find the words to describe the agony of their comrades, incredible tales of individual valor, their own mortality. Also recounting their experiences are the women who nursed these soldiers and black troops who were getting their first taste of battle. The raw vitality of battle sketches by Edwin Forbes and Alfred R. Waud complement the words of the participants.
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To the North Anna River: Grant and Lee, May 13-25, 1864

By Gordon C. Rhea

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Rhea looks at the initial campaign between Ulysses S. Grant and Robert E. Lee between May 13 and 25, 1864--a phase that was critical in the clash between the Army of the Potomac and the Army of Northern Virginia. Rhea charts the generals' every step and misstep in their efforts to outfox each other.
Includes illustrations and maps.

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Stafford County in the Civil War

By Homer D. Musselman

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Stafford County was occupied territory for much of the Civil War whilst battles were fought in nearby areas. The war had a tremendous impact on the economy of the county and historic sites remain to help tell the tale.
Includes black and white illustrations, an index, and a roster of troops from Stafford County.

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African-American History of Stafford, Virginia

(This brochure was originally printed in the fall of 2002.)

Colonial Times

Africans first arrived in the Virginia colony in 1619 as indentured servants. In the late 1600s slaves were brought into the sparsely settled Rappahannock Valley, primarily to serve as agricultural laborers.

Fredericksburg! Fredericksburg!

By George C. Rable

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Rable offers a detailed history of the Fredericksburg campaign and shows how the horrific carnage (with 13,000 casualties on the Union side and 5,000 Confederate casualties) haunted military and civilian survivors on both sides.
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War So Terrible: A Popular History of the Battle of Fredericksburg

By Donald C. Pflanz

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Local Park Ranger Don Pfanz gives a history of the battle. Includes maps.

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