History Books

A Pocket History of the Civil War

By Martin F. Graham

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This is a small book. It lacks gorgeous illustrations, but it -is- concise, plainly-written and published by one of the most recognized companies for military history for the National Civil War Museum. If a reader wants a compact overview, complete with "Test Your Knowledge" sections for each chapter, the pocket history is the way to go. Includes a glossary.

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Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville: The Dare Mark Campaign

By Daniel E. Sutherland

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Even the most massive battle is only part of a larger campaign. From the winter of 1862 through 1863, the Confederacy experienced major victories at Fredericksburg and Chancellorsville, showing up the Union's weaknesses in strategy and preparation. As to the title, a Confederate soldier referred to the Rappahannock River as "the Dare Mark" as it was a strategic point that must be controlled, and the campaign described here reflects that conflict.
This book is part of the Great Campaigns of the Civil War series.

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General Jo Shelby's March

By Anthony Arthur

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Some Confederate officers and soldiers refused to live in a conquered land. General Jo Shelby was one of those. He led his 300 men, the "Iron Brigade," on a twelve-hundred-mile march to Mexico where they supported the Emperor Maximilian in his fight against Juarez's rebels, hoping to eventually establish their own government there. Though doomed, his actions were historically notable--all the more so since in his later years, he returned to the United States, renounced slavery, became U.S. Marshall for western Missouri and became famous as a nineteenth-century progressive.

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The Battle of Antietam: The Bloodiest Day

By Ted Alexander

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"The worst hit was the 30th Virginia. This was a unit composed of shopkeepers, clerks, skilled craftsmen and farmers from the Fredericksburg area. They went into the fight with 236 men and lost 172, killed, wounded and captured, 68 percent of the regiment." (p. 84)

In a single day, 23,000 men died, were captured or were wounded at the Battle of Antietam, near Sharpsburg, Maryland, on September 17, 1862. The Chief Historian for the Antietam site gives a fascinating look at the men and battlefield movements that went into that very long and very bloody day. He also includes sections on hospital conditions and how the battle was remembered in the decades following.
Part of the History Press' Civil War sesquicentennial series.

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The Battle of Brandy Station: North America's Largest Cavalry Battle

By Eric J. Wittenberg

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On June 9, 1863, in the aftermath of the Battle of Chancellorsville, Union soldiers ambushed sleeping Confederates on the banks of the Rappahannock, beginning the largest cavalry battle ever fought on American soil. With enough unusual and personal detail to make it very readable, this volume includes clear maps, photographs, and a GPS guided tour of the battlefield.
Part of the History Press' Civil War Sesquicentennial Series.

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Private Fleming at Chancellorsville: The Red Badge of Courage and the Civil War

By Perry Lentz

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Historian Perry Lentz reveals the link between the classic novel, The Red Badge of Courage, and the reality of the Battle of Chancellorsville. To illustrate, he takes the well-documented experiences of Private Henry Fleming of the 304th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment and his fellows to show how the novel reflected and expanded on the soldiers' reality.

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Secretariat's Meadow: The Land, the Family, the Legend

By Kate Chenery Tweedy, Leeanne Ladin, Wayne Dementi

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"On March 30, 1970, Secretariat drew his first breath in a little white foaling shed on a historic farm called The Meadow in Caroline County, Virginia. Three years later he would leave the nation breathless as he captured the Triple Crown, shattering records and rivals alike. At The Meadow, America's Super Horse learned to gallop across its rolling fields and its loamy track. There, Secretariat first felt the calming hand of a groom, the taste of a bit in his mouth and the weight of a rider on his back. At The Meadow, the foundation was laid for a legend. Though much has been written about his spectacular racing career, the complete story of Secretariat s birthplace and the Chenery family who raised and raced him has never been told...until now. And a Chenery granddaughter is telling it. Secretariat's Meadow: The Land, the Family, the Legend reveals an intimate picture of this storied place from the viewpoint of Kate Chenery Tweedy, daughter of Penny Chenery (Tweedy) and granddaughter of Meadow Stable s founder Christopher T. Chenery."

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Virginia Horse Racing: Triumphs of the Turf

By Virginia C. Johnson and Barbara Crookshanks

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"Virginia, mother of presidents, is also the mother of American horse racing. From the very beginning, Virginians have risked it all on the track as eagerly as on the battlefield. Follow the bloodlines of three foundation sires of the American Thoroughbred through generations of rollicking races and largerthan- life grandees wagering kingly stakes, sometimes on horses not yet born. How did the horse nicknamed Damn His Eyes get protection money from other horse owners? What did it mean to tap the claret to break a neck-and-neck tie? Why was Confederate cavalry so much better than the Union--was it the riders, or was it the mounts? All these and many more stories of horsemanship on and off the track fill the pages of Virginia Horse Racing: Triumphs of the Turf."

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Confederates in the Attic: Dispatches From the Unfinished Civil War

By Tony Horwitz

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"Propelled by his boyhood passion for the Civil War, Horwitz embarks on a search for places and people still held in thrall by America's greatest conflict. The result is an adventure into the soul of the unvanquished South, where the ghosts of the Lost Cause are resurrected through ritual and remembrance... . Written with Horwitz's signature blend of humor, history, and hard-nosed journalism, Confederates in the Attic brings alive old battlefields and new ones 'classrooms, courts, country bars' where the past and the present collide, often in explosive ways. Poignant and picaresque, haunting and hilarious, it speaks to anyone who has ever felt drawn to the mythic South and to the dark romance of the Civil War."

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Founding Mothers: The Women Who Raised Our Nation

By Cokie Roberts

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"...an intimate and illuminating look at the fervently patriotic and passionate women whose tireless pursuits on behalf of their families -- and their country -- proved just as crucial to the forging of a new nation as the rebellion that established it. While much has been written about the men who signed the Declaration of Independence, battled the British, and framed the Constitution, the wives, mothers, sisters, and daughters they left behind have been little noticed by history. Roberts brings us the women who fought the Revolution as valiantly as the men, often defending their very doorsteps. While the men went off to war or to Congress, the women managed their businesses, raised their children, provided them with political advice, and made it possible for the men to do what they did.

"The behind-the-scenes influence of these women -- and their sometimes very public activities -- was intelligent and pervasive.Drawing upon personal correspondence, private journals, and even favored recipes, Roberts reveals the often surprising stories of these fascinating women, bringing to life the everyday trials and extraordinary triumphs of individuals like Abigail Adams, Mercy Otis Warren, Deborah Read Franklin, Eliza Pinckney, Catherine Littlefield Green, Esther DeBerdt Reed, and Martha Washington -- proving that without our exemplary women, the new country might never have survived."

Also available on audio and in large print.

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