History Books

The Ghosts of Virginia, Volume IV

By L. B. Taylor, Jr.

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Ghost tales and folklore from Northern Virginia, the Shenandoah Valley, Richmond and Central Virginia, Roanoke and Central Virginia, Southside Virginia, Tidewater Virginia, Fredericksburg and the Northern Neck. Part of a popular series by the same author.
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Stonewall Jackson: The Man, the Soldier, The Legend

By James I. Robertson, Jr.

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This massive examination of Jackson's life and legacy by one of the nation's leading Civil War historians gives plenty of insight for both scholars and laymen.
This multiple award-winner includes photos, diagrams, notes, bibliography, and index.
Also available on audio.

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The Bloody Crucible of Courage: Fighting Methods and Combat Experience of the Civil War

By Brent Nosworth

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Weapons and tactics changed immensely during the Civil War. The advances both during the war and the years leading up to it are discussed. Rifle musket, trench warfare, as well as artillery, cavalry and psychological tactics are discussed at length. Includes over 70 diagrams, maps and period illustrations.
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Holiday Fare: Favorite Williamsburg Recipes

By John R. Gonzales

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Clear step-by-step directions for more than 60 recipes from Colonial Williamsburg's Christmastime festivities.
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Physick: The Professional Practice of Medicine in Williamsburg, Virginia, 1740-1775

By Sharon Cotner et al.

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Photographs and text from the Colonial Williamsburg Foundation illuminate the practice of medicine in 18th century Virginia. Some of the featured topics include medical education, treatments, surgery, and brief biographical sketches of several local practictioners. The authors have worked together for years at the CWF's Pasteur and Galt Apothecary Shop and are specialists in 18th-century history.

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The Lee Girls

By Mary P. Coulling

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Robert E. Lee and Mary Anna Randolph Custis Lee lived at Arlington House while he worked at the War Office in Washington. During the 1830s and 1840s, they had seven children, four of whom were girls. This book tells of the lives of Mary, Anne, Agnes, and Mildred, none of whom married, two of whom died young, and all of whom were known as "the Lee girls."

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Alvin, Recollections and Reflections

By John Harding, Jr.

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Though listed in our catalog as fiction, this biography interweaves much truth in its retelling of the life of Alvin "Stack" Wormley, an actual person born in 1912 in the Northen Neck. He worked as a farmer, fisherman, oysterman, in a canning factory and fought in World War II. The author knew and liked this man and set down some of his many conversations with him. After Alvin Wormley's death, John Harding, Jr. interviewed his friends and relatives to better tell the tale of an upstanding, uncommon man.
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Hurricane of Independence: The Untold Story of the Deadly Storm at the Deciding Moment of the American Revolution

By Tony Williams

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On September 2, 1775, the eighth deadliest Atlantic hurricane of all time landed on American shores. Over the next days, it would race up the East Coast, striking all of the important colonial capitols and killing more than four thousand people. In an era when hurricanes were viewed as omens from God, what this storm signified to the colonists about the justness of their cause would yield unexpected results.
Drawing on ordinary individuals and well-known founders like Washington and Franklin, Tony Williams paints a stunning picture of life at the dawn of the American Revolution, and of the weighty choice people faced at that deciding moment.
(From the publisher's description)
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The Lees of Virginia, Seven Generations of an American Family

By Paul C. Nagel

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"There are few American families that feature such a collection of characters, both heroic and ignoble, who have made such a mark on history as the Lees. In The Lees of Virginia, Paul Nagel chronicles seven generations of Lees, covering over two hundred years of accolades and scandals. We meet Thomas Lee, who dreamed of America as a continental empire, and his son, Arthur Lee, who created a political storm with his accusations against Benjamin Franklin. Arthur's cousin was Light-Horse Harry Lee, a controversial cavalry officer in the Revolutionary War, whose wild real estate speculation led to imprisonment for debt and finally self-exile in the Caribbean. One of Harry's sons, Henry Lee, further disgraced the family by seducing his sister-in-law and frittering away Stratford, the Lees' ancestral home. It was a third son, Robert E. Lee, who would become the family's redeeming figure, a brilliant tactician still revered for his lofty character and military success. In these and numerous other portraits, Nagel discloses how, from 1640 to 1870, a family spirit united the Lees, making them a force in Virginian and American affairs."
(From the publisher's description)

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