History Blog

10/20/2014 - 11:54am
Crash Course in Genealogy

Genealogical research is a profession for some and a hobby for many.  With the advent of TV shows such as “Who Do You Think You Are?” and the multitude of resources available online, there are some interested novices entering the field who need a little help knowing where to start.  The following brief overview is for these beginners.

04/19/2013 - 7:40pm
Ruth Coder Fitzgerald: A Life Filled with Determination

“She was always very generous with her time and hospitality to me, and I loved working with her. She helped me with my walking tour as well. I have not been in touch with her over the past several years, but to this day whenever I give one of my walking tours downtown, I make sure that all on the tour with me are made aware that the basis for most of the information shared on the walking tour is the result of the great work and passion of one Ruth Coder Fitzgerald and her book -- A Different Story. In my view, Ruth was always a caring and powerful voice for the underdog, the ‘little guy,’ and her lifelong commitment to inform, to teach, and advocate for that particular constituent speaks volumes about her makeup, her sense of fairness for all, and her heart of gold. My admiration and love for Ruth, and what she stood for, is never-ending.”

--Jervis Hairston, former City Planner and local historian

On April 10, 2013, a highly-regarded pioneer in local African American history died at her home in downtown Fredericksburg. Ruth Coder Fitzgerald was well-known throughout the community for her historical research and writings as well as for her championing of an important cause for Vietnam veterans.

04/14/2013 - 7:21pm
Historic Garden Week in Virginia

History and gardening fans get together April 20 through 27, 2013, throughout the Commonwealth to tour gardens of houses great and small from the Tidewater area to the Highlands. The Rappahannock Valley portion of the tour will be held Tuesday, April 23, in the Fredericksburg area, including Stafford County:

"To celebrate the anniversary – this tour will feature homes that were opened 80 years ago! Featured locations include Belmont in Falmouth, Virginia, The Snowden House, Chatham, Brompton and Fall Hill. All of these properties enjoy spectacular views of the area and the Rappahannock."

Tours will be offered in different venues throughout the state through Saturday, April 27. Check out the Garden Club of Virginia's Web site for information on all the tours and check out books from the library featuring homes and gardens in the Old Dominion.

04/05/2013 - 2:13pm

To fight a duel, whether with swords or pistols, remains one of the most romantic and violent tropes of the 17th through the 19th centuries. From Alexandre Dumas’ D'artagnan to the Firefly episode, “Shindig,” the deadly side of an old and polite society remains fascinating to today’s audiences.  But are the scenarios laid out in fiction exaggerated for our amusement? Surely, no civilized people would resort to such violence over mere words—or, would they?

Andrew Jackson, later the seventh President of the United States, fought in more than a dozen duels, and received a bullet in his lung from one of them that remained there until his death nineteen years later. What did he duel over? His first opponent was an attorney who made him look foolish in court. It ended with shots fired in the air.  He later chose to duel the first governor of Tennessee, a political rival, when that man accused him of adultery—technically true as Jackson’s wife’s divorce from her first husband wasn’t finalized when she remarried. And what was the cause of the duel that got him a bullet in the lung? An argument about a horse race. Wounded for life or not, Andrew Jackson won that duel. He took the hit in the chest and then killed his opponent.

04/03/2013 - 8:55am
CRRL Genealogy Program

The first two “Introductory Genealogy & Beyond” classes, co-sponsored by the Fredericksburg Regional Genealogical Society and the Central Rappahannock Regional Library, have been spectacularly successful.  So successful, in fact, that the original venue will not do anymore, and all future classes will be held in the Free Lance-Star's Community Room, located at 616 Amelia Street.

The next class will be on Saturday, April 13, beginning at 9 AM. Professional genealogist Phyllis Legare, CG, will be speaking first on “Timelines in Genealogy,” and then on “Military Research.” Ms. Legare has been researching for her family for many years and for clients as well. Phyllis’ main joy in genealogy is finding the family stories. She loves to share her knowledge about genealogy research and also loves to learn—a never-ending process for researchers.

04/02/2013 - 9:56am

Free Lance, Tuesday, March 6, 1888

VIRGINIA EDITORS IN A DEADLY DUEL

A Newspaper War Ends in a Tragedy—Ellis Williams Shot Through the Heart, and Edwin Barbour Seriously Wounded— [illegible]

CULPEPER, VA, March 1. — One of the most desperate and deadly shooting affrays that ever happened in this vicinity occurred here this morning, between Edwin Barbour, editor of the Piedmont Advance, and Ellis B. Williams, son of Governor Williams, editor of the Culpeper Exponent, resulting in the death of Williams and the serious wounding of Barbour.  Both are young men and their families are highly-connected. The cause of the trouble seems to have grown out of a newspaper article, in the shape of a letter, dated from Washington and Signed “Jack Clatterbuck,” which was published some weeks ago in the Piedmont Advance.  The letter made some sharp and caustic allusions to Mr. Williams, of the Exponent.  Last Friday’s issue of the Exponent contained a bitter article denouncing the editor of the Advance and all connected with it, saying the editor was more an object of pity than of resentment, and that he was not the principal, but was put up to it by someone else.  To day’s issue of the Advance contains an editorial in which the editor brands Mr. Williams as a liar, and further says that “his conduct in this matter has been cowardly in the extreme, and highly unbecoming a gentleman, of which class we shall no longer consider him a member,” and winds up the article in this wise “At times it becomes necessary for a gentleman to turn and strike the dog that is barking at his heels.”

03/07/2013 - 3:01pm
Book cover of Not for Ourselves Alone by Geoffrey Ward

For Women's History Month, we've gathered books about intelligent, brave, and resourceful women through the centuries. Some are well-known. Some are not. Some wore jewels and silk. Some wore lab coats. Some were spies and soldiers. Others were athletes, politicians, and hearth-keepers. All are fascinating.

02/27/2013 - 3:31am
Civil War Recipes: Receipts from the Pages of Godey’s Lady’s Book

By the mid-1800s, American middle class women frequently turned to Godey’s Lady’s Book for household advice, sewing patterns, and recipes. Although founded by Louis Godey, from 1837 to 1877, it was led by Editor Sarah Josepha Hale and under her leadership, circulation rose dramatically. In Civil War Recipes, Lily May and John Spaulding have done a very nice job of selecting recipes from the first part of the 1860s run of the magazine and presenting them along with enough culinary history to make for an interesting read.

02/20/2013 - 1:36pm
Book cover of Days of Grace: A Memoir by Arthur Ashe and Arnold Rampersad

The University of Mary Washington's 2013 Chappell Great Lives Lecture Series continues on Thursday, February 21, with a lecture on Arthur Ashe by Arnold Rampersad, co-author (with Ashe) of Days of Grace: A Memoir:

An inspiring memoir of a remarkable man who was the true embodiment of courage, elegance, and the spirit
to fight: Arthur Ashe--tennis champion, social activist, and person with AIDS. Frank, revealing, touching -
Days of Grace is the story of a man felled to soon.
 
Find out more about this lecture on the University of Mary Washington's web site.
 
All lectures in the university's Great Lives series are held at 7:30pm, in Dodd Auditorium, George
Washington Hall, and are free and open to the public.
 
For more on this topic, check out these items from the library:
 
African American Trailblazers directed by Eric Allan Futterman (DVD)
[An] homage to the significant contributions and accomplishments of twelve heroic African Americans from
Virginia honoring those who exemplify the inspiring characteristics of the African American Trailblazers.
(catalog summary)
04/24/2013 - 11:55am
Screenshot of UMW Great Lives web site

Each spring the University of Mary Washington presents the Chappell Lecture Series Great Lives: Biographical Approaches to History. This series brings authors and experts to Fredericksburg to discuss the lives of some of history's most fascinating men and women. 

All lectures are free and open to the public, and take place at 7:30pm, at Dodd Auditorium on the UMW campus.

The 2013 series is as follows (for more information, see the Great Lives web site):

Click on a name for a list of related library materials available for checkout or home access.

Thursday, January 24: Julius Caesar presented by Philip Freeman
Tuesday, January 29:  Cleopatra presented by Duane W. Roller
Thursday, February 7:  Brigham Young presented by John Turner
Tuesday, February 12:  Lawrence of Arabia presented by Nabil Al-Tikriti
Thursday, February 14:  Houdini presented b yJohn Kasson
Thursday, February 21:  Arthur Ashe presented by Arnold Rampersad
Tuesday, February 26:  Marilyn Monroe presented by Carl Rollyson
Thursday, February 28:  Marian Anderson presented by Raymond Arsenault
Tuesday, March 12:  Walter Cronkite presented by Douglas Brinkley
Tuesday, March 19:  Winston Churchill presented by Jeremy Black
Tuesday, March 26:  The Pacific Admirals of World War II presented by Walter R. Borneman
Tuesday, April 2:  Queen Elizabeth II presented by Sally Bedell Smith
Tuesday, April 9:  Bill Wilson (Founder of Alcoholics Anonymous) presented by Susan Cheever
Thursday, April 11:  Ernest Hemingway presented by Paul Hendrickson
Tuesday, April 16:  Rasputin presented byJoseph Fuhrmann
Thusday, April 18:  Abraham Lincoln presented by Michael Burlingame
Tuesday, April 23:  Michelangelo presented by William Wallace
Thursday, April 25:  Madness and Greatness presented by Nassir Ghaemi

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