Holidays

It's St. Patrick's Day!

By Rebecca Gomez

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"This Level 1 rhyming reader introduces young children to the St. Patrick's Day holiday, from dressing in green outfits to marching in a musical parade! It's St. Patrick's Day follows two children as they celebrate this joyous Irish holiday. Beautiful illustrations compliment easy-to-read rhyming text. From dressing in green outfits to dancing an Irish reel, from finding a four-leaf clover singing Irish songs and marching in a parade, everyone can be Irish on this special day!"
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St. Patrick's Day

By Dorothy Rhodes Freeman

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St. Patrick's Day -- Fact or fiction? -- Growing up in Britain -- Kidnapped! -- Patrick saves the crew -- Return to Ireland -- Patrick, the saint -- Famous legends -- St. Patrick's Day celebrations -- St. Patrick's Day in a school -- Special symbols.
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St. Patrick's Day

By Dorothy Goeller

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Green here, green there. Everything seems to be green. Why so much green? Full-color photos and simple text uncover the reason why.
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St. Patrick's Day

By Molly Aloian

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On March 17th of each year, millions of people all over the world celebrate St. Patrick's Day. Taste the foods, hear the music, and dance the dances that make up his celebration. The history of this celebration will captivate children and teach them about Irish culture and traditions.
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Presidents' Day

By Lynn Peppas

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What began as a day to celebrate the birthday of George Washington, the first president of the United States of America, has grown to include every other president to serve as leader of the country. Learn all about Presidents' Day, from its earliest beginnings to how Americans celebrate this occasion today. Children will love this easy-to-understand introduction of this important national holiday.
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Valentine's Day

By Dorothy Goeller

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Beginning readers find out how many hearts are just enough for a Valentine's Day card.
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Moonbeams, Dumplings & Dragon Boats: A Treasury of Chinese Holiday Tales, Activities & Recipes

By Nina Simonds, Leslie Swartz, & the Children's Museum of Boston

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"Filled with delectable recipes, hands-on family activities, and traditional tales to read aloud, this extraordinary collection will inspire families everywhere to re-create the magic of Chinese holidays in their own homes. They can feast on golden New Year's dumplings and tasty moon cakes, build a miniature boat for the Dragon Boat Festival and a kite at Qing Ming, or share the story of the greedy Kitchen God or the valiant warrior Hou Yi."
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Time to Get Popping

Popcorn was grown by Native Americans long before the Europeans came to the New World. The Aztecs used it, strung into garlands, in their religious ceremonies. Peruvians toasted and ate their popcorn, which was called pisancalla. During the 1830's, it was "discovered" by American farmers who, using a new kind of plow, planted acres and acres of it during the 1850s. By the turn of the 19th century, popcorn vendors could be found in every big city. They'd sell their wares by the bag or the ball and make a profit of about 70 cents on every dollar!

An American Thanksgiving

Everybody knows that the Pilgrims celebrated the first Thanksgiving, right? Well, probably not, but it was the Pilgrims' Thanksgiving that gave us our Thanksgiving holiday as we know it today.

The Pilgrims came to the New World looking for a way to worship God as they wished. They were not Puritans. Puritans wanted to change the Church of England to do away with its bishops but keep its ties to the government. The Puritans went on to settle the Massachusetts Bay Colony. The Pilgrims at the Plymouth Colony were Separatists.

All Fun: Red Planet Day

Each November 28 is celebrated as “Red Planet Day.”  Red Planet Day commemorates the launch of the Spacecraft Mariner 4 on November 28, 1964. Its 228-day mission brought the spacecraft within 6,118 miles of Mars on July 14, 1965, sending us back the first close-up photos of the red planet.

Mars is a very bright planet, and when it’s in range, you can usually see it without a telescope.  Of course, if you have a telescope—or binoculars—you will get a better look.  Fortunately, in November the skies are usually clear, and Mars can sometimes be seen in the early morning.  With the Internet, you can find a star chart or other guide to show you where the planets should be in the night sky. If you can’t see the stars where you are because of light pollution, ask if your parents can take you out in the countryside where the view is better.