Shelf Life Blog

How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 24 Easy Steps by Mordicai Gerstein

How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 2

Plant sunflowers on the Moon? What a great idea! Now, how can we get there? Why, a bicycle of course!

Have you ever looked at the Moon and thought it looked sad? It’s all by its lonesome and nothing lives there. For one young boy his sole mission is to cheer up the Moon. How does he plan to cheer up the moon? By planting sunflowers! In the picture book How to Bicycle to the Moon to Plant Sunflowers: A Simple but Brilliant Plan in 24 Easy Steps, author Mordicai Gerstein has laid out a plan for anyone to follow to reach the Moon. NASA hasn’t even thought of it! All you will need is a bicycle, a huge slingshot, an extremely long garden hose, and a spacesuit, size extra small, from NASA. Sounds easy, right? Have you gotten permission from your parents? Uh, oh, that could be the most difficult part of this brilliant plan.

If you like Breaking Night by Liz Murray

Breaking Night by Liz Murray
This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.
 
Breaking Night by Liz Murray: "The memoir of a young woman who at age 15 was living on the streets but survived to make it to Harvard. Murray's story was featured in the Lifetime Original Movie 'Homeless to Harvard.'" 
 
If you enjoyed this title and are looking for similar nonfiction titles, here are some books you may enjoy:
 
Angela's Ashes by Frank McCourt
The author chronicles his impoverished childhood and early experiences in the Catholic church, and describes his father's alcoholism and talent for storytelling, as well as the challenges and tragedies his mother faced, balancing painful memories with humor. (catalog description)
 
 
 
 
Another Place at the Table by Kathy Harrison
For more than a decade, Kathy Harrison has sheltered a shifting cast of troubled youngsters-the offspring of prostitutes and addicts; the sons and daughters of abusers; and teenage parents who can't handle parenthood. What would motivate someone to give herself over to constant, largely uncompensated chaos? How does she manage her extraordinary blended family? Why would anyone voluntarily take on her job? (catalog description)
 
 
 

The Borrower of the Night by Elizabeth Peters

Vicky Bliss. The name sounds like a Vegas showgirl, and she has the body to match, but Miss, no, Dr. Bliss, has a lot more going on than the ability to make most every man’s jaw drop when she enters a room. Vicky is brilliant, brave, and extremely self-assured. She’s also a woman on a mission to unravel a centuries-old mystery to find the final resting place of a jewel-adorned sculpture lost during Europe’s religious wars.

The Ramsay Scallop by Frances Temple

Fourteen-year-old Elenor did not wish to be married, particularly not to Lord Thomas. He had been away at the Crusades for years, and what Elenor remembered of him did nothing to endear him to her. What was more, there was so much of the world to see, and marriage would end her chances for adventure, or so she believes at the beginning of Frances Temple's The Ramsay Scallop.

The Tales of Olga da Polga by Michael Bond

The Tales of Olga da Polga by Michael Bond

The Tales of Olga da Polga, by Michael Bond—creator of the Paddington Bear books, features a feisty, queenly, and imaginative guinea pig who leaves the dull life of an English pet shop to go live with her own “Sawdust People” in “a house with legs” in their garden. For another guinea pig, it would be just a sensible, comfortable life change, but Olga is not just another guinea pig.

Dracula’s Guest: A Connoisseur's Collection of Victorian Vampire Stories edited by Michael Sims

Dracula’s Guest: A Connoisseur's Collection of Victorian Vampire Stories

The dying days of summer—hot and bright or fog-drenched and rainy—are a suitable time to escape to another century and into the Old World where vampires lurk in musty tombs and sometimes in the candlelight of high society.  Michael Sims' collection, Dracula’s Guest, does include Stoker’s title story, but it is also a gathering of kindred pieces that lay out tales both plain and highly-embroidered of the pernicious beings known as vampires.  These old school blood-drinkers do not sparkle handsomely in daylight and are decidedly and viciously carnivorous.

Deadly Pink by Vivian Vande Velde

Deadly Pink by Vivian Vande Velde

Grace Pizzelli lacks pizzazz—or sparkle or brilliance or whatever you want to call it—unlike her brainy, beautiful, popular sister Emily. Grace was dozing off peacefully one day in trigonometry class when an unexpected summons to the principal’s office interrupted her nap. Mom was there, looking frantic and very un-put-together and, frankly, very unMomlike. Emily is missing. No, not her body. They know right where that is, but her mind is stuck somewhere in a video game. On purpose, no less, which is very unlike the totally perfect college student and computer genius everybody knows. In Deadly Pink, by Vivian Vande Velde, the Rasmussen gaming company has a huge problem. Players can only stay in total immersion games for so long before their bodies can’t take it anymore. If Emily doesn’t come out soon, she’s in big trouble, not to mention Rasmussen having a giant publicity meltdown over their dead programmer. Not dead as in messed-up-in-the-game-start-over dead, but really dead.

Going Through the Gate by Janet S. Anderson

Going Through the Gate by Janet S. Anderson

Sixth-grade graduation is not just about the punch and cookies in Janet Anderson’s Going Through the Gate. In an incredibly small town with a one-room schoolhouse, only a handful of students graduate every June. They know their lives will change completely—but not for the reasons you’d think. Sure, they’ll be taking the bus to the big city middle school and join a grade with hundreds of kids in it instead of just five.  There’s more to it than that though. The graduation itself can be dangerous.

A Simple Murder by Eleanor Kuhns

Cover to A Simple Murder

Widower William Rees drove his wagon into town like a man possessed. Normally an easy-going, itinerant weaver, Rees has just discovered that his kinfolk have cheated him, and his son has run away to be with the Shaker religious community. In 18th-century, rural Maine, it is not so easy to retrieve a teenager who hates you, get your land back, or solve A Simple Murder.

The Tradition Masters by Odetta

The Tradition Masters by Odetta

Being dubbed "The Queen of Folk" is no small feat. Having Martin Luther King, Jr. give you that title is something else entirely. That is how strongly affecting the music of folk pioneer Odetta is.

The Tradition Masters is a collection of Odetta's most invigorating traditional songs. Born in Birmingham in 1930, Odetta Holmes helped to embody both the Civil Rights and the Folk Revival movements of the 1950's and 60's. One could say that she was in the right place at the right time, but that would fail to credit her heart-stopping talent as a musician and vocalist.