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Art Film Screening Tomorrow: Frida Kahlo

Great Women Artists: Frida Kahlo

Come learn about the life of Frida Kahlo, one of the most fascinating artists of the 20th century. Frida began to paint in 1925. Today Kahlo's work is critically and monetarily as prized as that of her male peers, sometimes more so. Learn more about this cultural icon.

This film is recommended for high school age students and up.

We'll be screening Frida Kahlo (45 min., 2006) on Tuesday, March 22, 7pm, Headquarters Library theater.

Art Films in the Library are offered In partnership with the Fredericksburg Center for Creative Arts and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts.

Find out about upcoming films!

If you like The World Is Flat by Thomas L. Friedman

The World Is Flat by Thomas L. Friedman

This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids. You can browse the book matches here.

The World is Flat: A Brief History of the Twenty-First Century by Thomas L. Friedman is a wonderful look at the world. Here are a few titles, which you may enjoy, that deal with global business, the world, and its future.
 

Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order” by Samuel P. Huntington
Huntington here extends the provocative thesis he laid out in a recent (and influential) Foreign Affairs essay: we should view the world not as bipolar, or as a collection of states, but as a set of seven or eight cultural "civilizations"?one in the West, several outside it?fated to link and conflict in terms of that civilizational identity. Thus, in sweeping but dry style, he makes several vital points: modernization does not mean Westernization; economic progress has come with a revival of religion; post-Cold War politics emphasize ethnic nationalism over ideology; the lack of leading "core states" hampers the growth of Latin America and the world of Islam. Most controversial will be Huntington's tough-minded view of Islam. Not only does he point out that Muslim countries are involved in far more intergroup violence than others, he argues that the West should worry not about Islamic fundamentalism but about Islam itself, "a different civilization whose people are convinced of the superiority of their culture and are obsessed with the inferiority of their power. From Publisher’s Weekly
 

The Elephant and the Dragon: The Rise of India and China and What it Means for All of Us” by Robyn Meredith
Meredith, a foreign correspondent, describes the global power shift occurring in India and in China as computers continue to change the way business is conducted. The U.S. and Europe have lost both low- and high-paying jobs to these countries, and there are other factors at play, such as the unquenchable global thirst for oil and massive environmental issues. ]his is a complicated story because as jobs are lost, cheap goods are being imported and sold at low prices to American consumers, and some retailers' stock prices are rising, to the benefit of workers' 401K accounts. The author notes, "In this decade, a dear pattern emerged: China became factory to the world, the United States became buyer to the world, and India began to become back office to the world." In this thought-provoking and well-researched book, the author advises that the U.S. must strengthen its education system, promote innovation, forget about protectionism or unfettered free markets, and focus on creating jobs. From Booklist
 

Jimi Sounds Like a Rainbow by Gary Golio

Jimi Sounds Like a Rainbow

Jimi Hendrix was an iconic force in rock and roll.  His name is synonymous with music.  In the book Jimi Sounds Like a Rainbow, author Gary Golio introduces us to the young Jimi.  The book begins in 1956 in Seattle, Washington, where Jimi was living with his father.  They were not wealthy, but Jimi's father recognized that his son had a love for music.  Jimi often practiced on his one-string ukele.  With it he recreated the sounds the raindrops made as they hit the roof and the windowpanes.  Even as a very young boy he interpreted the city sounds that he heard outside the boardinghouse where he lived with his Dad and turned them into melodies.

Salem Church Lobby Book Sale: Friday, March 18 - Thursday, March 24

Salem Church Lobby Book Sale

Our monthly book sale begins Friday, March 18!

Stop by the lobby book sale at Salem Church  for great bargains.

Tuesdays are 1/2 price days and Wednesdays and Thursdays $1-a-bag/box or ¢.05 for each item.

2607 Salem Church Road
Fredericksburg, VA 22407
Phone: 540-785-9267

Find out about our other book sales.

The Widower's Tale by Julia Glass

The Widower's Tale by Julia Glass

The seventy-year-old widower and retired librarian, Percy Darling, in Julia Glass’ The Widower’s Tale, has been entrenched in his old house for 30 years after the tragic death of his wife. He’s definitely set in his eccentric ways. But in order to help his daughter Clover find a job, he has allowed the local preschool, Elves and Fairies, to renovate his barn to use as their new venue if they hire Clover. The changes begin with a small purchase: Percy has to give up his daily skinny dipping in the pond on his property and wear a garish pink pineapple print swimsuit for his daily swim.

The world opens up for Percy on his pilgrimage out of Matlock, a small town near Boston.  He falls in love with a younger woman with child and she becomes ill.  His perfect grandson, who is in premed at Harvard, inadvertently gets involved in eco-terrorism through his roommate Arturo. There's Ira, the gay preschool teacher whose partner helps Percy's daughter with her custody battle. And there's the illegal Guatemalan gardener.  Funny and sad, Percy’s dilemmas help him grow and form friendships and show his love for his family.
 

CRRL Presents: Stagedoor Productions - Community Theater at its Best

Roy Jarnecke and Charlotte Fields talk to Debby Klein

This interview airs beginning March 16.
Community Theater is not just about entertainment, it brings together a diverse group of dedicated, creative individuals who truly love what they do. Current President Roy Jarnecke and Past President Charlotte Fields talk to Debby Klein about their productions and programs and cultivating new playwrights in an annual festival that attracts worldwide response.

Visit the CRRL Presents page for channels and times.

Oogy: The Dog Only a Family Could Love by Larry Levin

Oogy, the Dog Only a Family Could Love

Sometimes you find a book that reflects your own life so much that you just have to get it and read it. That is the case with this book. Oogy was a 10-week-old puppy who was used as a bait dog in dog fighting and then left in an abandoned house to die. They think that approximately a week later police received a tip about recent dog fighting in the house and discovered Oogy lying inside. His ear was ripped off, part of his head was torn away and his jaw was broken. Instead of taking him to the county pound which would result in the puppy being euthanized, the police took him to the Ardmore Animal Hospital. There, a courageous woman who worked for the veterinarian fought to save him and inspired the whole staff of the animal hospital to keep Oogy alive.

Fairy Tales Find New Life

Beastly

You’re never too old for fairy tales! As proof, “Beastly” and “Red Riding Hood,” two movies aimed at teens, have recently been released.” 

Across the Universe by Beth Revis

Across the Universe by Beth Revis

In Across the Universe by Beth Revis, Amy leaves all she’s ever known behind and is cryogenically frozen to follow her parents as they set out on a 300-year journey to colonize a new planet only to be awakened early and alone.

Elder, the designated next leader of the ship’s crew, has been born years ahead of the rest of his generation, he is alone in a society with no room for difference. He admits to liking a little chaos, so how could he resist a girl his own age who appears in every way different from all he’s ever known.

But being different in an enclosed world means being an outcast, a challenge to the existing order of things, and perhaps even a threat. Eldest, the current leader and Elder’s mentor, states that the greatest threat to the ship is mutiny and the first cause of discord is difference. The other causes in his mind are lack of a strong central leader and individual thought. But is absolute control really the same as strong leadership? On a ship where every function is based on lies, Amy’s difference and Elder’s tendency toward independent thought threaten both their lives.

Meanwhile, someone is killing the frozen colonists.

Database in Depth: All About JSTOR

All About JSTOR

Research any field – from Business to Education to the Humanities to the Sciences – with the JSTOR database’s access to more than a thousand scholarly journals and over 1 million images, letters, and other primary sources. JSTOR is accessible within the library and remotely from the Articles & Databases page.

This database is an archive, so issues from the past 2-3 years are not included for most titles. All journals are indexed back to the first issue. For instance, The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography goes back to volume 1, Issue 1 from July 1893. Some of the primary sources, such as pamphlets and personal collections, have content going back to the 1600s! The Cowen Tracts, containing the pamphlet collection of British Member of Parliament Joseph Cowen, goes back to 1603.