LibraryPoint Blog

08/31/2016 - 12:11pm
Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving by Jonathan Evison

Facing forty, Benjamin Benjamin finds himself in a dingy church basement attending a class called The Revised Fundamentals of Caregiving, which is also the name of a poignant novel by Jonathan Evison. Benjamin has lost his home and family, and a caregiver certificate might be his only chance at finding his way back to normalcy.

07/22/2015 - 4:33pm
Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong by Prudence Shen and Illustrated by Faith Erin Hic

Nothing Can Possibly Go Wrong is author Prudence Shen's laser-guided, satirical commentary on a clash of the cliques that has the potential to destroy friendships, dreams, and dozens of deadly, armored robots. 

Hollow Ridge High School is dealing with the fight of the century. In this corner we have the cheerleadering squad. Popular, gorgeous and fierce, these ladies are looking for some brand-new uniforms. Looking for funds throughout the school, merciless head cheerleader Holly has set her sights on one club's unused budget.

In the other corner is the robotics club. Led by their neurotic but clever president Nate, these geeks are not going down without a fight. 

Stuck in the middle of this struggle is poor Charlie, captain of the basketball team. His only crime is being the ex-boyfriend of Holly and Nate's best friend.

04/25/2013 - 3:16pm
Infinity and Me by Kate Hosford

One of my daughters enjoys math, science, and thinking about seemingly abstract concepts in practical terms. I brought home the picture book Infinity and Me by Kate Hosford, thinking it would be particularly suited to capture her interest. In it, a young girl named Uma stares at the night sky dotted with stars and asks how many there are. Maybe as many as infinity? And then she begins to wonder how other people imagine infinity.

She performs her own research, asking her friends, Grandma, school staff, and ponders their unique responses. Her friend Sam introduces her to the infinity symbol and Grandma explains how infinity reminds her of their family tree. Other ideas about infinity make her head hurt, like her music teacher's idea of infinity as music that goes in a circle and never ends.

04/24/2013 - 11:48am
Coming Soon: Next Generation OverDrive Experience

Starting tomorrow, our OverDrive eBook web site will have a new look and new features!

You'll be able to take advantage of streamlined checkout with One-Step Checkout, and a new web browsesr-based reader, OverDrive Read, will be available for many titles.

Find out more here and check out this video to see what’s coming soon:

04/24/2013 - 8:27am
Warm Bodies by Isaac Marion

R is a zombie. He can’t remember his name so he is down to one letter. R lives in an old airplane and collects pieces of his crumbling civilization.  He loves Frank Sinatra and the Beatles and listens to them on old vinyl records. He reminds me of Pixar’s Wall-e. R is in the early stages of decay so he doesn’t look too bad, but he does eat brains. He grunts and groans, he shrugs, and he shuffles in classic zombie fashion. A typical male, he is a man of few words. Although it is hard to be a fan of the walking dead, Isaac Marion’s Warm Bodies charmed me and also made me think about what it means to be human. We sometimes need monsters to remind us of our humanity.

07/21/2015 - 10:32am
Me Before You by Jojo Moyes

Louisa Clark happily goes to her waitressing job at The Buttered Bun, a place where she personally knows each customer by name. But the bad economy takes its toll and the café is abruptly closed. Kicking back and relaxing until something better comes along is simply not an option with Louisa’s parents depending on her financial help to make ends meet.

04/22/2013 - 2:04pm
Virginia Press Women's logo

Congratulations to Virginia Johnson, CRRL's Web Content Librarian, for winning Virginia Press Women’s 2013 first-place and second-place communications awards for her library blog entries! Read her award winning entries here:

1st place: Blogs: Non-profit, government, or educational
"The Seventeenth Child" and "Natalie Babbitt: Truth in Fairy Tales"

2nd Place: Specialty articles: Reviews
"The English Monster" and "The Uninvited Guests"

Congrats also to other local women who won awards:  Marty van Duyne, Falmouth writer and photographer; Cathy Jett, assistant business editor at The Free Lance-Star; K.J. Mushung, Stafford County writer and photographer; and Donna Harter Raab, executive director of the University of Mary Washington’s Advancement Campaign Initiative.

07/06/2015 - 2:47pm
The Darkest Minds by Alexandra Bracken

Ruby is 16 and lives at Camp Thurmond, a government-run work camp with harsh restrictions and brutal punishments in The Darkest Minds, by Alexandra Bracken. She has been there since she was 10, shortly after a deadly virus appeared and proved fatal to most of Ruby’s classmates. Survivors of the virus developed psychic abilities of varying levels, and they were grouped into five classifications that indicate their power/danger level: Blue, Green, Yellow, Orange, and Red, with red being the most dangerous. Ruby is secretly an Orange who has tricked the officials (her power is entering other people’s minds) into believing she is a Green, which has kept her safe until now. But the officials are aware that there are some hiding Yellows, Oranges, and Reds, and they are using new tactics to ferret them out.

04/19/2013 - 7:40pm
Ruth Coder Fitzgerald: A Life Filled with Determination

“She was always very generous with her time and hospitality to me, and I loved working with her. She helped me with my walking tour as well. I have not been in touch with her over the past several years, but to this day whenever I give one of my walking tours downtown, I make sure that all on the tour with me are made aware that the basis for most of the information shared on the walking tour is the result of the great work and passion of one Ruth Coder Fitzgerald and her book -- A Different Story. In my view, Ruth was always a caring and powerful voice for the underdog, the ‘little guy,’ and her lifelong commitment to inform, to teach, and advocate for that particular constituent speaks volumes about her makeup, her sense of fairness for all, and her heart of gold. My admiration and love for Ruth, and what she stood for, is never-ending.”

--Jervis Hairston, former City Planner and local historian

On April 10, 2013, a highly-regarded pioneer in local African American history died at her home in downtown Fredericksburg. Ruth Coder Fitzgerald was well-known throughout the community for her historical research and writings as well as for her championing of an important cause for Vietnam veterans.

04/19/2013 - 3:31am
Beyond the Body Farm by William Bass

This readalike is in response to a patron's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

Beyond the Body Farm by William Bass: A forensic anthropologist tracks the field's increasing sophistication as reflected by cases throughout his career, describing such newer technologies as DNA processing and electron microscopy, and examining past cases in which new developments proved pivotal. 
 
If you enjoyed Beyond the Body Farm and are looking for other true crime books, here are some titles you may enjoy:
 
A Cold Case by Philip Gourevitch
A few years ago, Andy Rosenzweig, an inspector for the Manhattan District Attorney's office, was abruptly reminded of an old, unsolved double homicide. It bothered him that Frankie Koehler, the notoriously dangerous suspect, had eluded capture and was still at large. Rosenzweig had known the victims of the crime, for they were childhood friends from the South Bronx: Richie Glennon, a Runyonesque ex-prizefighter at home with both cops and criminals; and Pete McGinn, a spirited restaurateur and father of four. He resolved to find the killer and close the case. (worldcat.org)
 
During the time of the 1893 Chicago World's Fair, Dr. Henry Holmes built a torture palace to which he lured 27 victims, mostly young women. While the fair ushered in a new epoch in American history, Holmes marked the emergence of the serial killer, who thrived on the forces transforming the country. (worldcat.org)
 
 
 
 

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