Women of Courage

They have been strong in the face of adversity, daring to stand up for what they believe and often standing alone to accomplish what at the time may not have seemed extraordinary or history-making but in the context of historical perspective is awe-inspiring.

Love, Lucy

By Lucille Ball

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Lucille Ball wrote this book in the years leading up to 1964 and put it aside to avoid hurting Desi Arnaz. How fortunate we are that it has been found and published. It describes the many years of hard work that it took for her to become the star that we knew.

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The Majesty of the Law: Reflections of a Supreme Court Justice

By Sandra Day O'Connor

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"Tracing some of the origins of American law through history, people, and ideas, O'Connor sheds new light on the basics, and through personal observation she explores the development of institutions and ideas we have come to regard as fundamental. O'Connor discusses notable cases that have shaped American democracy and the Court as we know it today, and she traces the turbulent battle women have fought for a place in our nation's legal system since America's inception. Straight-talking, clear-eyed, inspiring, The Majesty of the Law is more than a reflection on O'Connor's own experiences as the first female Justice of the Supreme Court; it also contains a discussion of how the suffrage movement changed the lives of women--in voting booths, jury boxes, and homes across the country."

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Lives of Extraordinary Women: Rulers, Rebels (and What the Neighbors Thought)

By Kathleen Krull

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"...turns the spotlight on women who have wielded power, revealing their feats--and flaws--for all the world to see. Here you'll find twenty of the most influential women in history: queens, warriors, prime ministers, first ladies, revolutionary leaders. Some are revered. Others are notorious. What were they really like? In this grand addition to their highly praised series, Kathleen Krull and Kathryn Hewitt celebrate some of the world's most noteworthy women, ranging from the famous to those whose stories have rarely been told." Features twenty extraordinary women:

Cleopatra -- Eleanor of Aquitaine -- Joan of Arc -- Isabella I -- Elizabeth I -- Nzingha -- Catherine the Great -- Marie Antoinette -- Victoria -- Harriet Tubman -- Tz'u-hsi -- Gertrude Bell -- Jeannette Rankin -- Eleanor Roosevelt -- Golda Meir -- Indira Gandhi -- Eva Peron -- Wilma Mankiller -- Aung San Suu Kyi -- Rigoberta Menchu.

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Illustrated History of Women

By Irene M. Franck, David M. Brownstone

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Presents a history of women around the world from earliest times (prehistory to 499 AD) to the present day (1998). A 10-volume set.

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The Women Who Wrote the War

By Nancy Caldwell Sorel

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Celebrates the accomplishments of World War II's female war correspondents, who risked their lives in combat zones to provide firsthand reports on the events of the war.

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Extraordinary Women of Medicine

By Darlene R. Stille

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Lively narratives briefly profile fifty female medical pioneers, beginning with women healers in ancient times. Chronological chapters proceed to the 1990s. Transitional chapters include First African American Doctors, Golden Age of Women Doctors, and Women in Medical Research.

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Diana: A Tribute to the People's Princess

By Peter Donnelly

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The Honorable Diana Frances Spencer's ultimate triumph owed nothing to her marriage to Prince Charles and everything to her inner qualities--an innate ability to understand and connect with ordinary people, especially the desperately sick, the rejected, and the "unloved."

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Call Me Anna : The Autobiography of Patty Duke

By Patty Duke and Kenneth Duran

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Patty Duke wrote this autobiographical account of her struggle for survival. Read about her firsts: the youngest actor to win an Oscar and the youngest actor to have a prime-time series bearing her own name, the many difficulties she faced as a child star, the tragic consequences of her long-undiagnosed illness, and her triumphs.

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A Woman of Egypt

By Jihan Sadat

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"This is an autobiography by Jehan Sadat, widow of Anwar el Sadat, tracing her early life in Cairo where she had a middle-class Egyptian upbringing, to when she was 17 and fell in love with a divorced revolutionary. She recounts how she and Anwar Sadat overcame her parents' objections to their marriage and how she was soon the wife of a rising political leader who was an intimate of President Nasser. When the President died unexpectedly, Anwar Sedat succeeded him. Thus Jehan Sadat began her life as wife of a political leader and tells of how she was the first wife of a Muslim leader to have her picture in a newspaper, to travel alone outside her own country and to take up public causes.

"Her courageous achievements in a world dominated by men and strict cultural traditions included reforming the divorce laws, setting up co-operatives for peasant women, nursing wounded veterans from Egypt's wars with Israel and supporting her husband who was under continuous attack. Her story concludes with the events surrounding her husband's assassination by right-wing fundamentalists."

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A Kind of Grace: The Autobiography of the World's Greatest Female Athlete

By Jacqueline Joyner-Kersee

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A three-time Olympic gold medalist in the multi-event heptathlon, Jackie Joyner-Kersee is recognized as one of the world's best female athletes. This autobiography tells of her youth in impoverished East St. Louis, Illinois, her fledgling athletic endeavors in high school, her collegiate years at UCLA, and her 12-year career as a world-class heptathlete and long jumper. Jackie recounts her courtship and marriage to her collegiate coach, Bob Kersee, and her struggle to recognize her asthma, making the adjustments that would permit her to continue competing.

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