History

04/02/2010 - 10:44am

(This brochure was originally printed in the fall of 2002.)

Colonial Times

Africans first arrived in the Virginia colony in 1619 as indentured servants. In the late 1600s slaves were brought into the sparsely settled Rappahannock Valley, primarily to serve as agricultural laborers.

10/12/2009 - 1:26pm

October 2009 marks the 150th anniversary of John Brown’s raid on Harpers Ferry.
Born in 1800 to an abolitionist couple, John Brown was raised to believe that slavery was a sin and an insult to God. These beliefs influenced his actions throughout his life.

11/03/2009 - 4:30pm

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

In the Stacks 

"Be Careful Where You Park: Archeology in Fredericksburg Market Square," by Joshua Duncan. Fredericksburg History and Biography (Volume 1) (2002): 26-39.
This article is about the early history of Town Hall/Market Square and the archaeological excavation of the Square.
11/05/2009 - 10:52am

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

Black Businesses and Services, Rappahannock Area compiled by Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc., Xi Upsilon Omega chapter.
Copyright 1997.
11/04/2009 - 5:09pm

By Sue Willis, CRRL Staff

From the Central Rappahannock Regional Library

Coping with Jim Crow: Black Education in Fredericksburg by Constance Greer O'Brion.
Education and segregation in Fredericksburg from the 40's to the 70's.

A Different Story: A Black History of Fredericksburg, Stafford, and Spotsylvania, Virginia by Ruth Coder Fitzgerald.
Ms. Fitzgerald traces the area's black history from the colonial days to the 1970s. Includes photos of community leaders, past and present. Of particular interest are the following chapters: Moving into the Mainstream by the Reverend Lawrence Davies and "Let Him Speak" by Dr. Philip Y. Wyatt.
11/02/2009 - 1:51pm

By The Rappahannock Valley Civil War Roundtable

No great battles were fought within Stafford County, but during the winter of 1862-1863, 120,000 men of the Army of the Potomac camped along its ridges and valleys. The federal army combed the countryside, stripping the inhabitants of nearly everything - livestock, fence rails, crops, and lumber. With little remaining to eat and firewood for heating scarce (some sources claim that only 20 trees pre-dating the war exist in the county today), most residents were forced to leave. When these homes were found abandoned, Union soldiers simply pulled down the house and used it for firewood.

10/22/2009 - 2:01pm

With steaming cups in hand, today's Fredericksburg area coffee shops continue a tradition which dates back three centuries to the founding of the town.

Walk in gentlemen, rest at your ease,
Pay for what you call for, and call for what you please.

This verse hung over the doorway of The Coffee House in old Fredericksburg. Located in the first Market House/Town Hall on Caroline Street near William, it was here that 18th- and 19th-century Fredericksburgers sipped their favorite brew and pondered questions from the political to the classical.

04/01/2010 - 1:09pm

This directory was printed in the main body of The Free Lance newspaper. 

The Free Lance.

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1885.

[Entered at the Post-Office at Fredericksburg, Va., as second-class matter.] 

The Business of Fredericksburg.

Our Business Directory is as complete as we can make it for the present. It shows the organization of the city, the courts, the churches partially, the several societies, together with the date of their meetings, and also our active business men, individually, as firms.

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