17th century

Empires in the Forest: Jamestown and the Beginning of America

By Avery Chenoweth ; photographs, Robert Llewellyn

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"This beautiful work of photography and prose traces the ways in which American culture grew out of the conflict that characterized the first contact between Native Americans and Europeans."
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Before and After Jamestown: Virginia's Powhatans and Their Predecessors

By Helen C. Rountree and E. Randolph Turner III

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Addressed to specialists and nonspecialists alike, Before and After Jamestown introduces the Powhatans--the Native Americans of Virginia's coastal plains who played an integral part in the life of the Williamsburg and Jamestown settlements--in scenes that span 1,100 years, from just before their earliest contact with non-Indians to the present day.

This first comprehensive overview of the Powhatans emphasizes how the Powhatan jigsaw has been pieced together with bits of evidence from archaeology, history, and cultural anthropology. Synthesizing a wealth of documentary and archaeological data, the authors have produced a book at once thoroughly grounded in scholarship and accessible to the general reader. Recognized authorities in Powhatan archaeology and ethnography, they have also extended the historical account through the native people's long-term adaptation to European immigrants and into the immediate present and their continuing efforts to gain greater recognition as Indians.
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Pocahontas, Powhatan, Opechancanough: Three Indian Lives Changed by Jamestown

By Helen C. Rountree

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"Despite their roles as senior politicians in these watershed events, no biography of either Powhatan or Opechancanough exists. And while there are other "biographies" of Pocahontas, they have for the most part elaborated on her legend more than they have addressed the known facts of her remarkable life. As the 400th anniversary of Jamestown's founding approaches, nationally renowned scholar of Native Americans, Helen Rountree, provides in a single book the definitive biographies of these three important figures. In their lives we see the whole arc of Indian experience with the English settlers -- from the wary initial encounters presided over by Powhatan, to the uneasy diplomacy characterized by the marriage of Pocahontas and John Rolfe, to the warfare and eventual loss of native sovereignty that came during Opechancanough's reign."
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Pocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma: An American Portrait

By Camilla Townsend

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"...differs from all previous biographies of Pocahontas in capturing how similar seventeenth-century Native Americans were-in the way they saw, understood, and struggled to control their world-not only to the invading English, but also to ourselves.Neither naive nor innocent, Indians like Pocahontas and her father, the powerful king Powhatan, confronted the vast might of the English with sophistication, diplomacy, and violence. Indeed, Pocahontas's life is a testament to the subtle intelligence that Native Americans, always aware of their material disadvantages, brought to bear against the military power of the colonizing English."
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Love and Hate in Jamestown: John Smith, Pocahontas, and the Heart of a New Nation

By David A. Price

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A gripping narrative of one of the great survival stories of American history: the opening of the first permanent English settlement in the New World. Drawing on period letters and chronicles, and on the papers of the Virginia Company–which financed the settlement of Jamestown–David Price tells a tale of cowardice and courage, stupidity and brilliance, tragedy and costly triumph. He takes us into the day-to-day existence of the English men and women whose charge was to find gold and a route to the Orient, and who found, instead, hardship and wretched misery. Death, in fact, became the settlers’ most faithful companion, and their infighting was ceaseless.

Price offers a rare balanced view of the relationship between the settlers and the natives. He unravels the crucial role of Pocahontas, a young woman whose reality has been obscured by centuries of legend and misinformation (and, more recently, animation). He paints indelible portraits of Chief Powhatan, the aged monarch who came close to ending the colony’s existence, and Captain John Smith, the former mercenary and slave, whose disdain for class distinctions infuriated many around him–even as his resourcefulness made him essential to the colony’s success.
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The Powhatan Indians of Virginia: Their Traditional Culture

By Helen C. Rountree

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The author, a professor of anthropology at Old Dominion University, brings together archaeological studies and first-hand accounts from settlers to give a recounting of this people's culture and how it changed with the coming of the Europeans.

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Powhatan's Mantle: Indians in the Colonial Southeast

By Gregory A. Waselkov, Peter H. Wood, and Tom Hatley

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Considered a classic study of southeastern Indians, Powhatan’s Mantle demonstrates how ethnohistory, demography, archaeology, anthropology, and cartography can be brought together in fresh and meaningful ways to illuminate life in the early South. In a series of provocative original essays, a dozen leading scholars show how diverse Native Americans interacted with newcomers from Europe and Africa during the three hundred years of dramatic change beginning in the early sixteenth century.
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Virginia in Maps: Four Centuries of Settlement, Growth, and Development

By Richard W. Stephenson and Marianne M. McKee

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Virginia's long and rich history is documented by thousands of maps that trace the discovery, settlement, expansion, and growth of the commonwealth, yet no comprehensive atlas of the entire state has ever been published. Virginia in Maps fills that void, providing access to more than 200 color images of the most important maps of the colony and of the state in a single, large-format volume. The atlas's five essays by leading cartographic scholars will make it an essential reference and educational tool.
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The Stronghold, a Story of the Historic Northern Neck of Virginia and Its People

By Miriam Haynie

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Mrs. Haynie tells in story form the history of the Northern Neck of Virginia covering the 17th, 18th and 19th centuries. Mrs. Haynie writes about the distinguished men and women - George Washington and Robert E. Lee among them - who were born there. She also discusses and records many of the traditions and customs unique to this region of the state. Invaluable as a reference book for those interested in the history of Virginia.
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The Life of Cople Parish, 1664-1964, in Westmoreland County, Virginia

By Bertha Lawrence Newton Davison

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"A compilation of five articles originally published in the Northern Neck of Virginia historical magazine."
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