Caldecott Medal

2010 Award-Winning Children's Books

Newbery Medal

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The Newbery Medal was named for eighteenth-century British bookseller John Newbery. It is awarded annually by the Association for Library Service to Children, a division of the American Library Association, to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.

The Polar Express

By Chris Van Allsburg

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A magical train ride on Christmas Eve takes a boy to the North Pole to receive a special gift from Santa Claus. Winner of Caldecott Medal in 1986. JE Fic Van

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The Polar Express

By Chris Van Allsburg

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A magical train ride on Christmas Eve takes a boy to the North Pole to receive a special gift from Santa Claus. Winner of Caldecott Medal in 1986.

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Once a Mouse: A Fable Cut in Wood from Ancient India

By Marcia Brown

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"No one shall tell me that I was once a mouse!" roars the tiger. But an old hermit, mighty at magic, does tell him; for it was he who first changed the tiger from a wretched little mouse to a stout cat, to a big dog, and finally, to his proud and royal self.
[From the publisher's description]

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The Hello, Goodbye Window

By Norton Juster, illustrated by Chris Raschka

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The first picture book by the author of the classic "The Phantom Tollbooth" tells the story of a little girl who finds a magic gateway in the kitchen window of her grandparents' house, and the voyage of discovery she takes.
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So You Want To Be President?

By Judith St. George and David Small (illustrator)

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Rollicking cartoon caricatures animate this clever collection of quirky tidbits and all-too-human facts about those 41 white males that we have come to know as "President."

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The Invention of Hugo Cabret

By Brian Selznick

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When twelve-year-old Hugo, an orphan living within the walls of a Paris train station in 1931, meets a mysterious toyseller and his goddaughter, his undercover life and his biggest secret are in danger.

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The Invention of Hugo Cabret

By Brian Selznick

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When twelve-year-old Hugo, an orphan living and repairing clocks within the walls of a Paris train station in 1931, meets a mysterious toyseller and his goddaughter, his undercover life and his biggest secret are jeopardized. 

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Verna Aardema: "The Bookworm Who Hatched"

"Long, long ago, when the earth was set down and the sky was lifted up, all folktales were owned by the Sky God."

So begins an Ashanti tale, Anansi Does the Impossible!, retold by Verna Aardema. Anansi the Spider and his clever wife, Aso, use their wits to buy the folk tales for the Ashanti people. Verna Aardema spent much of her life retelling these folktales.

Great Reads from David Small

When David Small was, well, small, he was often sick and had to stay home from school. He would spend hours drawing and making up stories for fun to keep from being bored. He grew up in the very big city of Detroit, but he spent his summers out in the countryside with his grandparents. David was shy, but he enjoyed being with the animals on the farm, and he loved visiting museums with his parents and taking art lessons.