If you like The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

"The Hound of the Baskervilles is one of master mystery writer Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's most accomplished stories. Sherlock Holmes and his companion Dr. Watson confront one of their most difficult cases ever: is there truly a curse on the old Baskerville estate? Is there truly a ghostly beast lurking on the dark, eerie moors? A masterful concoction of plot and mood, this story is guaranteed to give you the shivers." (Book Summary)

If you like The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, you may like these books:

First, read the other many Sherlock Holmes adventures by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
 

The Beekeeper's Apprentice by Laurie R. King
Laurie R. King writes a series of books featuring Mary Russell and Sherlock Holmes. So if you like this book, you'll have other titles to try!
"In 1915, long since retired from his observations of criminal humanity, Sherlock Holmes is engaged in a reclusive study of honeybee behavior on the Sussex Downs. Never did he think to meet an intellect to match his own-until his acquaintance with Miss Mary Russell, a very modern fifteen-year-old whose mental acuity is equaled only by her audacity, tenacity, and penchant for trousers and cloth caps. Under Holmes's tutelage, Russell hones her talent for deduction, disguises, and danger: in the chilling case of a landowner's mysterious fever and in a kidnapping in the wilds of Wales. But her ultimate challenge is yet to come. Soon the two sleuths are on the trail of a murderer whose machinations scatter meaningless clues...but whose objective is quite unequivocal: to end Russell and Holmes's partnership-and their lives." (catalog summary)
 

The Italian Secretary: A Further Adventure of Sherlock Holmes by Caleb Carr
"Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson are summoned to the aid of Queen Victoria in Scotland by a telegram from Holmes' brother, Mycroft, a royal advisor. Rushed northward on a royal train-and nearly murdered themselves en route-the pair are soon joined by Mycroft, and learn of the brutal killings of two of the Queen's servants, a renowned architect and his foreman, both of whom had been working on the renovation of the famous and forbidding Royal Palace of Holyrood, in Edinburgh. Mycroft has enlisted his brother to help solve the murders that may be key elements of a much more elaborate and pernicious plot on the Queen's life. But the circumstances of the two victims' deaths also call to Holmes' mind the terrible murder-in Holyrood-of "The Italian Secretary," David Rizzio. Only Rizzio, a music teacher and confidante of Mary, Queen of Scots, was murdered three centuries ago. Holmes proceeds to alarm Watson with the announcement that the Italian Secretary's vengeful spirit may have taken the lives of the two men as punishment for disturbing the scene of his assassination. Critically acclaimed, bestselling author Caleb Carr's brilliant new offering takes the Conan Doyle tradition to remarkable new heights with this spellbinding tale." (catalog summary)

Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie
If you like one Agatha Christie, you're in for a treat, as she has dozens and dozens of mysteries, all equally adept at diverting you from solving the case! This one, written in 1934, features her odd but brilliant detective, Hercule Poirot.
"Just after midnight, the famous Orient Express is stopped in its tracks by a snowdrift. By morning, the millionaire Samuel Edward Ratchett lies dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside. One of his fellow passengers must be the murderer. Isolated by the storm, detective Hercule Poirot must find the killer among a dozen of the dead man's enemies, before the murderer decides to strike again."
(Amazon.com)
 

The Murders in the Rue Morgue: The Dupin Tales by Edgar Allan Poe
"Includes The Murders in the Rue Morgue,The Mystery of Marie Roget, and The Purloined Letter. Between 1841 and 1844, Edgar Allan Poe invented the genre of detective fiction with three mesmerizing stories of a young French eccentric named C. Auguste Dupin. Introducing to literature the concept of applying reason to solving crime, these tales brought Poe fame and fortune to live on. Years later, Dorothy Sayers would describe "The Murders in the Rue Morgue" as "almost a complete manual of detective theory and practice." Indeed, Poe's short mysteries inspired the creation of countless literary sleuths, among them Sherlock Holmes. Today, the Dupin stories still stand out as unique, utterly engrossing page-turners." (catalog summary)
 

The New Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: Original Stories edited by Martin Harry Greenberg and Carol-Lynn Rossel Waugh
Sixteen new Sherlock Holmes stories authorized by the estate of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, authored by, among others, Stephen King, John Gardner, Stuart Kaminsky, Peter Lovesey, Dorothy B. Hughes, and Anne Perry.
 

Too Many Cooks and Champagne for One by Rex Stout
Rex Stout wrote slews of mysteries about an eccentric detective and his sidekick. Not British, but a classic nonetheless!
"A grand master of the form, Rex Stout is one of America's greatest mystery writers, and his literary creation Nero Wolfe is one of fiction's greatest detectives. In this pair of classic Nero Wolfe mysteries, Stout is at his unparalleled best as the arrogant, gourmandizing, sedentary sleuth and his trusty man-about-town, Archie Goodwin, are served two lethally appetizing cases. Too Many Cooks Everyone knows that too many cooks spoil the broth, but you'd hardly expect it to lead to murder. But that's exactly what's on the menu at a five-star gathering of the world's greatest chefs. As guest of honor, Wolfe was lured from his brownstone to a posh southern spa to deliver the keynote address. He never expected that between courses of haute cuisine he and Archie would be compelled to detect a killer with a poison touch--a killer preparing to serve the great detective his last supper. Champagne for One: Faith Usher talked about taking her own life and even kept cyanide in her purse. So when she died from a lethal champagne cocktail in the middle of a high society dinner party, everyone called it suicide--including the police. But Nero Wolfe isn't convinced--and neither is Archie. Especially when Wolfe is warned by four men against taking the case. Deception, blackmail, and a killer who may have pulled off the perfect crime...it's a challenge Nero Wolfe can't resist." (catalog summary)