If you like Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

When the wealthy and very eligible bachelor Charles Bingley purchases an estate in the Bennets' small town, he and the beautiful Jane immediately fall in love. But Bingley's arrogant friend Darcy just as quickly alienates Lizzy when she overhears him speaking dismissively of her.

Pride and Prejudice

After you've read Pride and Prejudice, the first place to start is to read all of Jane Austen’s novels. Then, check out these modern titles that have been influenced by Austen's romantic tale of manners.

Pride and Prejudice has produced numerous adaptations. Some of the notable film versions include that of 1940, starring Greer Garson and Laurence Olivier (based in part on Helen Jerome's 1936 stage adaptation) and that of 2005, starring Keira Knightley and Matthew Macfadyen. Notable television versions include two by the BBC: a 1980 version starring Elizabeth Garvie and David Rintoul and the popular 1995 version, starring Jennifer Ehle and Colin Firth.

Pemberley Mansion is thrown into chaos after Elizabeth Bennett's disgraced sister Lydia arrives and announces that her husband Wickham has been murdered.

Returning with her sister, Jane, to their Ohio hometown when their father falls ill, New York magazine editor Lizzy Bennett confronts challenges in the form of her younger sisters' football fangirl antics, a creepy cousin's unwanted attention and the infuriating standoffish manners of a handsome neurosurgeon.

The best-selling author of The Thorn Birds presents a sequel to Pride and Prejudice that finds the willful third Bennet sister setting out in her late thirties in pursuit of adventure while her sisters worry about her at home.

A mysterious plague has fallen upon the quiet English village of Meryton—and the dead are returning to life! Feisty heroine Elizabeth Bennet is determined to wipe out the zombie menace, but she's soon distracted by the arrival of the haughty and arrogant Mr. Darcy.

Becky Collins has always been determined not to submit to the pressures of Victorian society. But her marriage doesn't bring her the opportunities she'd hoped for, and her outspokenness does not find favor with the gentrified ladies of Pemberley. As the unintended consequences of her errors in judgment engulf her, Becky begins to understand what's really important in life. But has she learned her lessons too late?

View more suggestions for modern retellings of Pride and Prejudice.