LibraryPoint Blog

Keep up-to-date with the latest news about the Central Rappahannock Regional Library.
Wed, 12/17/2014 - 2:08pm
The Armageddon Rag by George R.R. Martin

Sandy Blair was not having his best day, or decade for that matter, when he got word that Jamie Lynch had his heart cut out. In The Armageddon Rag by George R.R. Martin, the child of the Sixties has been orphaned by the "Me" Decade. Now, it's 1983, and all of Blair's political ideals have earned him a middling career as a novelist and a lot of writer's block.

Mon, 12/15/2014 - 11:41am
The Edge on the Sword by Rebecca Tingle

In Rebecca Tingle’s The Edge on the Sword, Flæd tries to ignore the man who pursued her. In truth, he had been behind her for all of the day, and at night he would sit outside her door. Golden-haired Flæd was accustomed to running free in the great woods with her little brother Edward, only returning to her father's stronghold to take her meals with her family and her lessons from Bishop Asser.

Fri, 12/12/2014 - 8:20am
Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.
 

Oryx and Crake by Margaret Atwood: "As in The Handmaid's Tale, Atwood has seen the future, and it isn't good: get ready for ecological devastation." (Library Journal) 

If you like Oryx and Crake, you may also enjoy some of the following novels:

 

The Children of Men by P.D. James
The human race has become infertile, and the last generation to be born is now adult. Civilization itself is crumbling as suicide and despair become commonplace. Oxford historian Theodore Faron, apathetic toward a future without a future, spends most of his time reminiscing. Then he is approached by Julian, a bright, attractive woman who wants him to help get her an audience with his cousin, the powerful Warden of England. She and her band of unlikely revolutionaries may just awaken his desire to live . . . and they may also hold the key to survival for the human race. (catalog description)
 

The Chrysalids by John Wyndham
The Chyrsalids is set in the future after a devastating global nuclear war. David, the young hero of the novel, lives in a tight-knit community of religious and genetic fundamentalists, always on the alert for any deviation from the norm of God's creation. Abnormal plants are publicly burned, with much singing of hymns. Abnormal humans (who are not really human) are also condemned to destruction--unless they succeed in fleeing to the Fringes, that Wild Country where, as the authorities say, nothing is reliable and the devil does his work. (catalog description)

Thu, 12/11/2014 - 10:57am
Carnivores by Aaron Reynolds

The top of the food chain has some serious self-esteem issues in Aaron Reynold's Carnivores. Lion, Great White Shark, and Timber Wolf are majestic and fearsome predators. This meat-eating crew might look tough, but deep down they are dealing with some major insecurities.

Mon, 12/15/2014 - 12:30pm
Responsive website viewed on desktop, laptop, tablet, and smartphone

Have you ever been frustrated trying to use a website from your smartphone that just doesn’t work on your device? We recently redesigned LibraryPoint.org to be usable from all sorts of mobile devices, from small smartphone screens to larger tablets, in addition to standard desktops. Now when you come to the site, images resize to be the right size for your device, and menus become dropdowns through which you can easily scroll to select your option. We’ve removed unnecessary text so you can find what you need quickly, without having to wade through extra clutter.

Thu, 12/11/2014 - 3:37pm
The House of Small Shadows by Adam Nevill

In The House of Small Shadows, protagonist Catherine has had a bleak past. After losing her job at a top TV network in London thanks to corporate insecurity, she decides to move on with her life and experience the tedious job of antiquing and auctioning. She welcomes a new challenge assigned by her elderly boss: cataloging and maintaining a massive doll collection owned by the niece of infamous taxidermist M.H. Mason. Catherine finds it thrilling to also examine the strange and sentimental display of stuffed animals, posed and costumed in bloody scenes from the Great War.

Tue, 12/09/2014 - 8:55am

Want to make a lovely hostess gift or start a delightful family tradition? Gorgeously photographed and utterly useful, Alison Walker’s Handmade Gifts from the Kitchen has recipes that are both elegant and inspired. You can make your own Candy Canes, Marzipan, Baklava, and Cherry & Almond Biscotti. Or, go British with Turkish Delight (shades of C.S. Lewis), Rose Creams, Vanilla Caramels, and Tiffin.

Mon, 12/08/2014 - 11:40am
Kokopelli's Flute by Will Hobbs

Tepary Jones hiked to the ruins of the ancient city on the night of a total lunar eclipse. He had always felt the magic of the forgotten spaces, but tonight the place seemed especially alive, its pictures of animal and mystic figures telling pieces of stories long forgotten.

Mon, 12/08/2014 - 11:43am
Blackbird: A Childhood Lost and Found by Jennifer Lauck

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

Blackbird: A Childhood Lost and Found by Jennifer Lauck: "Lauck's heartbreaking and inspiring memoir...tells how an ordinary child growing up under the blue skies of Carson City, Nevada, in the early 1970s lost her childhood after her world became unhinged by family tragedy." (Book Summary)

If you enjoyed this book for the author's engaging writing, you may enjoy these titles:
 

Change Me Into Zeus's Daughter by Barbara Robinette Moss

"With an unflinching voice, Barbara Robinette Moss chronicles her family's chaotic, impoverished survival in the red-clay hills of Alabama. A wild-eyed, alcoholic father and a humble, heroic mother along with a shanty full of rambunctious brothers and sisters fill her life to the brim with stories that are gripping, tender, and funny." (Amazon.com)

 

Driving with Dead People: A Memoir by Monica Holloway

"Holloway's candid story starts out innocently enough as she describes her eccentric family, especially her father, who loved "talking gore" and kept a movie camera in his pick-up for filming gruesome wrecks. Monica, too, has an obsession with death, and revels in her friendship with a mortician's daughter and their access to postmortems. When Monica reaches her teen years, her parents divorce. Her mother then decides it's "her turn," and she goes back to college, often leaving Monica and her next oldest sister alone. Holloway perceptively writes about hurtful moments embedded in her memory, such as her parents repeatedly telling her that her birth was a "mistake," and her mother's selfish refusal to pay for treatment for a kidney infection. The final piece of this dysfunctional family's puzzle falls into place when the oldest sister begins to remember being molested by their father; so, too, does Monica. Amidst a burgeoning number of abuse memoirs, Holloway's shines because of her deft handling of the small details while painstakingly assembling the larger picture." (Booklist)

Mon, 12/08/2014 - 3:48pm
To Dare Mighty Things: The Life of Theodore Roosevelt by Doreen Rappaport

To Dare Mighty Things, by Doreen Rappaport, brings Theodore Roosevelt to rough-riding, "Bully!"-shouting life, showing what made America's 26th president such a captivating figure.

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