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If you like The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

If you like The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

This readalike is in response to a customer's book-match request. If you would like personalized reading recommendations, fill out the book-match form and a librarian will email suggested titles to you. Available for adults, teens, and kids.  You can browse the book matches here.

The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne
In early colonial Massachusetts, a young woman endures the consequences of her sin of adultery and spends the rest of her life in atonement. (catalog summary)

If you enjoyed The Scarlet Letter and are interested in similar classic novels, as well as stories with similar themes, the following titles may be of interest to you:


Anna Karenina by Leo Tolstoy
The classic nineteenth-century Russian novel in which a young woman is destroyed when she attempts to live outside the moral law of her society. (catalog summary)




 



The Crucible
by Arthur Miller
In the rigid theocracy of Salem, rumors that women are practicing witchcraft galvanize the town's most basic fears and suspicions; and when a young girl accuses Elizabeth Proctor of being a witch, self-righteous church leaders and townspeople insist that Elizabeth be brought to trial. The ruthlessness of the prosecutors and the eagerness of neighbor to testify against neighbor brilliantly illuminate the destructive power of socially sanctioned violence. (catalog summary)

 

 


 

The Devil in Massachusetts: A Modern Enquiry Into the Salem Witch Trials by Marion Lena Starkey
This historical narrative of the Salem witch trials takes its dialogue from actual trial records but applies modern psychiatric knowledge to the witchcraft hysteria. Starkey's sense of drama also vividly recreates the atmosphere of pity and terror that fostered the evil and suffering of this human tragedy. (catalog summary)

 


 

The Happy Failure by Herman Melville
Herman Melville is widely recognized as one of the greatest writers America has ever produced. Had his metaphysical whaling novel, Moby-Dick, been his sole literary legacy, Melville's place in the pantheon of great writers would have been assured. But Melville created many other much-beloved classic works, such as Billy Budd, Sailor and Benito Cereno. Herein are ten stories representing some of the American master's best short work, including the tales "Bartleby, the Scrivener: A Story of Wall-Street," "The Happy Failure," and "The Paradise of Bachelors and the Tartarus of Maids." (catalog summary)

 

 

 

Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
In early nineteenth-century England, an orphaned young woman accepts employment as a governess at Thornfield Hall, a country estate owned by the mysteriously remote Mr. Rochester. (catalog summary)

 

 

 




Madame Bovary
by Gustave Flaubert
For this novel of French bourgeois life in all its inglorious banality, Flaubert invented a paradoxically original and wholly modern style. His heroine, Emma Bovary, a bored provincial housewife, abandons her husband to pursue the libertine Rodolphe in a desperate love affair. A succès de scandale in its day, Madame Bovary remains a powerful and scintillating novel. (catalog summary)

 

 

 




Wuthering Heights
by Emily Bronte
The passionate love of Catherine Earnshaw aCutnd Heathcliff mirrors the powerful moods of the Yorkshire moors. (catalog summary)